College of Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota
College of Science and Engineering
http://cse.umn.edu/

In memoriam: David A. Storvick

David A. Storvick photo - 300

School of Mathematics Emeritus Professor and former associate dean David A. Storvick passed away on Nov. 5, 2011. Storvick was a recognized researcher in the fields of complex analysis and mathematical physics. He was 82.

Storvick was born on Oct. 24, 1929 in Ames, Iowa. He received his bachelor’s degree from Luther College in 1951, a master’s degree from the University of Michigan in 1952, and a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Michigan in 1956 as a student of Arthur Lohwater.

After two years at Iowa State University, Storvick joined the University of Minnesota Department of Mathematics in 1957 as an assistant professor. He spent the rest of his career at Minnesota, being promoted to associate professor in 1961 and to full professor in 1966. He enjoyed three sabbaticals, during which he visited the University of Wisconsin, Imperial College, London, and the University of York.

During his career, Storvick published 39 papers in top level research journals, many of them written with another former colleague, Robert Cameron. His research accomplishments led to many invitations to speak at conferences throughout the world.

Storvick was particularly active in service to the School of Mathematics and University of Minnesota. He served as associate head of the School of Mathematics from 1964-70. He served as associate dean of the Institute of Technology (now called the College of Science and Engineering) from 1979-83 and then again from 1993-94. He served as Acting Director of the Gray Fresh Water Biological Institute from 1989-90. He also served several terms in the Faculty Senate and on University Senate committees.

After many years of dedicated teaching, research, and service, Storvick retired in 2004. He will be missed by his colleagues and friends here in Minnesota.

On July 1, 2010 the Institute of Technology changed its name to the College of Science and Engineering.