HSTM Undergrad courses

HSCI courses - Fall 2021

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HSCI 1585: MAMMOTHS, MINERALS, MONOCULTURE: HISTORY OF EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Description: This course investigates the many ways people across the globe have sought to understand the environment and the earth from antiquity to the present. We will study the context in which the modern earth and environmental sciences emerged, asking throughout the semester what knowledge traditions contributed to the development of the sciences we know today. We will investigate the historical perspectives that shaped three intersecting themes throughout the semester: the questions of geological time and of change in the study of the earth; human use of natural resources in industry and agriculture; and understandings of the earth and environment as a global system. We will examine secondary historical scholarship and primary sources from North and South America, Africa, Europe, and Asia in order to better understand the religious and philosophical stakes of earth and environmental science, the role of empire and state building in the development of geoscience, and the interrelationship of science and industry. More info. 

Units: 3.00

Dates: Sep 07, 2021 – Dec 15, 2021

Meeting times: MWF 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM (50 min)

Location: No room listed.

Instructor: Anna Graber

HSCI 1714: STONE TOOLS TO STEAM ENGINES: TECHNOLOGY AND HISTORY TO 1750

Description: Technology is an enormous force in our society, and has become so important that in many ways it seems to have a life of its own. This course uses historical case studies to demonstrate that technology is not autonomous, but a human activity, and that people and societies made choices about the technologies they developed and used. It asks how technological differences between nations influenced their different courses of development, and why some societies seemed to advance while others did not. We ask how technological choices can bring about consequences greater than people expected, and how we might use this knowledge in making our own technological choices. In particular, we explore the historical background, development, and character of the most widespread technological systems the world has known, from prehistoric stone tool societies, through Egypt and the pyramids, ancient Greece and Rome, the explosion of Islam, and the dynamic and often violent technologies of medieval Europe. More info. 

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 3714

Units: 3.00 - 4.00

Dates: Sep 07, 2021 – Dec 15, 2021

Meeting times: M 06:00 PM – 08:45 PM (165 minutes)

Location: No room listed.

Instructor: Mary Thomas

HSCI 1715: HISTORY OF MODERN TECHNOLOGY: WATERWHEELS TO THE WEB

Description: This course explores the many technological systems that have come to span our globe, alongside the widespread persistence of traditional technologies. We start with the earliest glimmerings of modernity and industrialization, and move on in time to the building of global technological networks. How have people changed their worlds through technologies like steam engines and electronics? Is it a paradox that many traditional agricultural and household technologies have persisted? How have technologies of war remade the global landscape? We ask how business and government have affected technological entrepreneurs, from railroads to technologies of global finance. We end by considering the tension between technologies that threaten our global environment and technologies that offer us hopes of a new world. More info. 

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 3714 

Units: 3.00 - 4.00

Dates: Sep 07, 2021 – Dec 15, 2021

Multiple sections.

HSCI 1814: REVOLUTIONS IN SCIENCE: THE BABYLONIANS TO NEWTON

Description: Development and changing nature of sciences in their cultural context. Babylonian/Greek science. Decline/transmission of Greek science. Scientific Revolution (1500-1700) from Copernicus to Newton. More info.

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 3814

Units: 3.00 - 4.00

Dates: Sep 07, 2021 – Dec 15, 2021

Multiple sections. 

HSCI 3211: BIOLOGY AND CULTURE IN THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES

Description:  Changing conceptions of life and aims and methods of biology; changing relationships between biology and the physical and social sciences; broader intellectual and cultural dimensions of developments in biology. More info.

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 5211

Units: 3.00

Dates: Sep 07, 2021 – Dec 15, 2021

Meeting times: TTh 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM (75 minutes)

Location: No room listed.

Instructor: Mark Borrello

HSCI 3244: NATURE'S HISTORY: SCIENCE, HUMANS, AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Description: We examine environmental ideas, sustainability, conservation history; critique of the human impact on nature; empire and power in the Anthropocene; how the science of ecology has developed; and modern environmental movements around the globe. Case studies include repatriation of endangered species; ecology and evolutionary theory; ecology of disease; and climate change. More info. 

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 5244

Units: 3.00

Dates: Sep 07, 2021 – Dec 15, 2021

Meeting times: TTh 09:45 AM – 11:00 AM (75 minutes)

Location: No room listed.

Instructor: Susan Jones

HSCI 3401: ETHICS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Description: In addition to examining the idea of ethics itself, this course will examine the ethical questions embodied in specific historical events, technological systems, and scientific enterprises. Commonly, technology is assumed to be the best engineered solution for a particular goal and (good) science is supposed to be objective; however, this is never truly the case, values and moral choices underlie all of our systems for understanding and interacting with the world around us. These values and choices are almost always contentious. Through a series of historical case studies we will grapple with the big issues of right and wrong and the role of morality in a technological world. Our goal will be to learn to question and think critically about the things we create, the tools we use, and the ideology and practice of science. More info.

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 5401.

Units: 3.00

Dates: Sep 07, 2021 – Dec 15, 2021

Meeting times: TTh 02:30 PM – 03:45 PM (75 min)

Location: No room listed.

Instructor: Honghong Tinn

HSCI 3714: STONE TOOLS TO STEAM ENGINES: TECHNOLOGY AND HISTORY TO 1750

Description: Technology is an enormous force in our society, and has become so important that in many ways it seems to have a life of its own. This course uses historical case studies to demonstrate that technology is not autonomous, but a human activity, and that people and societies made choices about the technologies they developed and used. It asks how technological differences between nations influenced their different courses of development, and why some societies seemed to advance while others did not. We ask how technological choices can bring about consequences greater than people expected, and how we might use this knowledge in making our own technological choices. In particular, we explore the historical background, development, and character of the most widespread technological systems the world has known, from prehistoric stone tool societies, through Egypt and the pyramids, ancient Greece and Rome, the explosion of Islam, and the dynamic and often violent technologies of medieval Europe. More info.

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 1714.

Units: 3.00 – 4.00

Dates: Sep 07, 2021 – Dec 15, 2021

Multiple sections. 

HSCI 3715: HISTORY OF MODERN TECHNOLOGY: WATERWHEELS TO THE WEB

Description: This course explores the many technological systems that have come to span our globe, alongside the widespread persistence of traditional technologies. We start with the earliest glimmerings of modernity and industrialization, and move on in time to the building of global technological networks. How have people changed their worlds through technologies like steam engines and electronics? Is it a paradox that many traditional agricultural and household technologies have persisted? How have technologies of war remade the global landscape? We ask how business and government have affected technological entrepreneurs, from railroads to technologies of global finance. We end by considering the tension between technologies that threaten our global environment and technologies that offer us hopes of a new world. More info. 

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 1715.

Units: 3.00 – 4.00

Dates: Sep 07, 2021 – Dec 15, 2021

Multiple sections. 

HSCI 3814: REVOLUTIONS IN SCIENCE: THE BABYLONIANS TO NEWTON

Description: Development and changing nature of sciences in their cultural context. Babylonian/Greek science. Decline/transmission of Greek science. Scientific Revolution (1500-1700) from Copernicus to Newton. More info.

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 1814.

Units: 3.00 – 4.00

Dates: Sep 07, 2021 – Dec 15, 2021

Multiple sections.

HSCI 4321: HISTORY OF COMPUTING

Description: Developments in the last 150 years; evolution of hardware and software; growth of computer and semiconductor industries and their relation to other business areas; changing relationships resulting from new data-gathering and analysis techniques; automation; social and ethical issues. More info.

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: CSCI 4921.

Units: 3.00

Dates: Sep 07, 2021 – Dec 15, 2021

Meeting times: TTh 01:00 PM – 02:15 PM (75 min)

Location: No room listed.

Instructor: Honghong Tinn

HMED courses - Fall 2021

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HMED 3001W: HEALTH, DISEASE, AND HEALING I

Description: Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care from classical antiquity through 18th century. More info. 

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HMED 3001V.

Units: 4.00

Dates: Sep 07, 2021 – Dec 15, 2021

Multiple sections. 

HMED 3075: TECHNOLOGY AND MEDICINE IN MODERN AMERICA

Description: How technology came to medicine's center-stage. Impact on production of medical knowledge, professionalization, development of institutions/industry, health policy, and gender/race disparities in health care. More info. 

Units: 3.00

Dates: Sep 07, 2021 – Dec 15, 2021

Multiple sections.

HMED 3993: DIRECTED STUDY

Description: Guided individual reading or study. More info.

Units: 1.00 – 4.00

Dates: Sep 07, 2021 – Dec 15, 2021

HSCI courses - Spring 2022

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HSCI 1011: DIGITAL WORLD

Description: Essential knowledge and critical perspective to understand today's Digital World. The history and social impact of the digital revolution, including security, surveillance, "virtual reality," and the future of the Internet. More info. 

Units: 3.00

Dates: Jan 18, 2022 – May 02, 2022

Multiple sections. 

HSCI 1212: LIFE ON EARTH: ORIGINS, EVOLUTION & ECOLOGY

Description: How have people explained where life came from and how it has developed over time? We examine controversies over life's origins, the Holocene extinction, human population growth, the Dust Bowl and soil conservation, DDT and falcon repatriation, and disease and responses to pandemics. Evolution, natural theology. Ecosystems. More info. 

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 1214W.

Units: 4.00

Dates: Jan 18, 2022 – May 02, 2022

Multiple sections. 

HSCI 1815: MAKING MODERN SCIENCE: ATOMS, GENES AND QUANTA

Description: How scientists like Darwin and Einstein taught us to think about nature; everything from space, time and matter to rocks, plants, and animals. More info. 

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 3815.

Units: 3.00 - 4.00

Dates: Jan 18, 2022 – May 02, 2022

Multiple sections.

HSCI 3242: NAVIGATING A DARWINIAN WORLD

Description: In this course we grapple with the impact of Darwin's theory of evolution in the scientific community and beyond. We'll examine and engage the controversies that have surrounded this theory from its inception in the 19th century through its applications in the 21st. What made Darwin a Victorian celebrity, a religious scourge, an economic sage and a scientific hero? We'll look closely at the early intellectual influences on theory development; study the changing and dynamic relationship between science and religion; and critically analyze the application of Darwin's theory to questions of human nature and behavior. More info.

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 5242.

Units: 3.00

Dates: Jan 18, 2022 – May 02, 2022

Meeting times: TTh 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM (75 min)

Location: No room listed.

Instructor: Mark Borrello

HSCI 3421: ENGINEERING ETHICS

Description:  Ethical issues in engineering research and engineers' public responsibility/practice, using historical cases; historical development of engineering as a vocation/profession; ethical implications of advanced engineering systems such as nuclear weaponry and networked communications. More info.

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 5421.

Units: 3.00

Dates: Jan 18, 2022 – May 02, 2022

Meeting times: MWF 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM (50 min)

Location: No room listed.

Instructor: Jennifer Alexander

HSCI 3611: ENLIGHTENMENT, REVOLUTION, AND THE RISE OF MODERN SCIENCE

Description:  Understanding the origins of our own culture of Modern Science in the Enlightenment of the eighteenth century. Newton's ambiguous legacy; science as wonder and spectacle; automata and monsters; early theories of sex and gender; empire and scientific expeditions; reshaping the environment; inventing human sciences; Frankenstein and the limits of science and reason. More info.

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 5611

Units: 3.00

Dates: Jan 18, 2022 – May 02, 2022

Meeting times: MW 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM (75 min)

Location: No room listed.

Instructor: Victor Boantza

HSCI 3815: MAKING MODERN SCIENCE: ATOMS, GENES AND QUANTA

Description: How scientists like Darwin and Einstein taught us to think about nature; everything from space, time and matter to rocks, plants, and animals. More info.

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: HSCI 1815

Units: 3.00 – 4.00

Dates: Jan 18, 2022 – May 02, 2022

Multiple sections

HSCI 4121W: HISTORY OF 20TH-CENTURY PHYSICS

Description: The transition from classical to modern physics (relativity, quantum) and its architects (from Planck and Einstein to Heisenberg and Schrödinger). The WWII bomb projects in the US and in Germany. Post-war developments (solid state, particle physics). More info. 

Credit will not be granted if credit has been received for: PHYS 4121W

Units: 3.00

Dates: Jan 18, 2022 – May 02, 2022

Meeting times: Th 04:40 PM – 07:20 PM (160 minutes)

Location: No room listed.

Instructor: Michel Janssen

HSCI 4455: WOMEN, GENDER, AND SCIENCE

Description: Three intersecting themes analyzed from 1700s to the present: women in science, sexual and gendered concepts in modern sciences, and impact of science on conceptions of sexuality and gender in society. More info.

Units: 3.00

Dates: Jan 18, 2022 – May 02, 2022

Meeting times: TTh 02:30 PM – 03:45 PM (75 min)

Location: No room listed.

Instructor: Anna Graber

HMED courses - Spring 2022

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HMED 3002W: HEALTH CARE IN HISTORY II

Description: Introduction to intellectual/social history of European/American medicine, health care in 19th/20th centuries. More info.

Units: 3.00

Dates: Jan 18, 2022 – May 02, 2022

Multiple sections 

HMED 3040: HUMAN HEALTH, DISEASE, AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN HISTORY

Description: Introduction to historical relationship of human health and the environment. How natural/human-induced environmental changes have, over time, altered our experiences with disease and our prospects for health. More info.

Units: 3.00

Dates: Jan 18, 2022 – May 02, 2022

Meeting times: TTh 09:45 AM – 11:00 AM (75 min)

Location: No room listed.

Instructor: Jennifer Gunn  

HMED 3055: WOMEN, HEALTH, AND HISTORY

Description:  Women's historical roles as healers, patients, research subjects, health activists. Biological determinism, reproduction, mental health, nursing, women physicians, public health reformers, alternative practitioners. Gender disparities in diagnosis, treatment, research, careers. Assignments allow students to explore individual interests. More info

Units: 3.00

Dates: Jan 18, 2022 – May 02, 2022

Meeting times: TTh 11:15 AM – 12:30 PM (75 min)

Location: No room listed.

Instructor: TBD

HMED 3993: DIRECTED STUDY

Description:  Guided individual reading or study. More info.

Units: 1.00 – 4.00

Dates: Jan 18, 2022 – May 02, 2022

Instructor: Jennifer Gunn