December 2014

Watch raindrops make asteroid-like collisions (slo-mo video)
Chemical engineering and materials science assistant professor Xiang Cheng led a group of researchers who found that raindrop impacts are remarkably similar to asteroid impacts by using high-speed photography and lasers to measure what happens when water drips into a pile of tiny glass beads. Dec. 29: Popular Science

Cybersecurity center of excellence seeks input on securing medical devices
The University’s Technological Leadership Institute has partnered with the National Institute of Standards and Technology to create a draft project to secure medical devices known as networked infusion pumps. Dec. 23: Signal Online

The Greenland Ice Sheet: Now in HD
The University’s Polar Geospatial Center has turned images captured by DigitalGlobe’s Worldview-1 and 2 satellites into publicly available elevation maps that researchers can use to track the ice. Dec. 18: EurekAlert!Phys.org; Ohio State University

Electric cars a mixed bag for health, climate
University researchers find that switching to vehicles powered by electricity made using natural gas yields large health benefits. Dec. 15: Popular Mechanics; Pioneer PressClimate Central; PNAS; ABC; NBCCTV; Yahoo! News Canada; Philly.com; Washington Times; Insider Monkey; KCBS; Christian Science Monitor; Green Car Reports; Good4Utah; NewsOK; Huffington Post; Manteca Bulletin; Tampa Tribune; Tribune-Review; Climate Central; Inquirer; Herald News; Kelona Daily Courier; Yahoo! News Malaysia; KWTX; MetroNews Canada; San Francisco Chronicle; WDIO; CTV News; KHON; Deseret News; ABC; Daily Journal; Fort Francis Times Online; Myfoxny; Dec. 16: CBS; New York Post; Business Standard; Zee News; HNGN; Rakyat Post; Green Car Reports; Silicon Republic; Autoevolution; Raw Story; R&D Mag; Portland Press Herald; Transport Evolved; Spokesman-Review; KRMG; Economic Times; News24; Product Design & Development; KXRM; Dec. 17: WCCO; FOX; Dec. 29: BostInno

People may inherit gut bacteria causing Crohn’s, ulcerative colitis
Computer science and engineering assistant professor Dan Knights led research that shows for the first time that people may inherit some of the intestinal bacteria that cause Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Dec. 16: HealthCanalScience World Report; Science Blog; India Tribune; News-Medical; Scicasts; Medical Xpress; Dec. 17: HealthSite; Jagran Post; Free Press Journal; Financial Express; EndoNurse

Students’ project probes black holes, galaxies
Physics doctoral student Melanie Galloway examines galactic structures that could be feeding massive black holes by turning to an online army of citizen scientists. Dec. 10: Minnesota Daily

Target is staging ground for Google’s 3D ‘Project Tango’
Computer science and engineering professor Stergios Roumeliotis has worked closely with Google on Project Tango since its inception.  Dec. 10: Pioneer Press

Bridge business/engineering skills gap to focus on key growth sectors
Electrical and computer engineering professor Massoud Amin, and director of the University;’s Technological Leadership Institute (TLI) discusses TLI’s courses and programs designed to bridge the gap between business and engineering. Dec. 9: Civic Caucus

CSE students put on annual Winter Light Show
Members of the student group Tesla Works spent hundreds of hours meticulously engineering lights to synchronize with a set of five songs. Dec. 4: Minnesota Monthly; Dec. 5: WCCO; Dec. 8: Minnesota Daily; KARE; KSTP

Sound bends light on a tiny chip
Electrical and computer engineering assistant professor Mo Li led a team that used electron beams and nanofabrication techniques to create nanoscale transducers small enough to excite the sound waves at high frequencies. Dec. 1: R&D MagPhotonicsControlled EnvironmentsTendenciasNoticias de la Ciencia; Dec. 9: Minnesota Daily

Dark matter detectives
Physics professor Marvin Marshak leads research at the Tower Soudan mine searching for the most elusive particles in the Universe. December issue: Smithsonian Air & Space Magazine

November 2014

CSE students put on annual Winter Light Show
Members of the student group Tesla Works spent hundreds of hours meticulously engineering lights to synchronize with a set of five songs. Nov. 29: Star Tribune; WCCO; KSTP; KARE; Minnesota Public Radio; Faribault County Register; Greenfield Daily Reporter

University professor solves problems from ‘gut bugs’ to Rubik’s Cube
Computer science and engineering assistant professor and self-proclaimed ‘computational biologist’ Dan Knights is researching the microbiome, specifically, the role of gut bacteria in health. Nov. 27: Pioneer Press

Sound bends light on a tiny chip
Electrical and computer engineering assistant professor Mo Li led a team that used electron beams and nanofabrication techniques to create nanoscale transducers small enough to excite the sound waves at high frequencies. Nov. 26: Science Codex; Nanowerk; Opli; Science 360; Nov. 27: Compound SemiconductorBGR; Nov. 30: Red Orbit

University pushes research from the labs to the market
Chemistry professor Andreas Stein said he has noticed a University-led push for researchers to patent their work into applicable technologies. Nov. 24: Minnesota Daily

Family fun includes the University’s Math and Science Family Fun Fair
Students and instructors at the University of Minnesota host a math and science fair for elementary through high school students. Nov. 19: Pioneer Press; Nov. 23: KSTP

Advocates: Minnesota needs more alternative fuel
Mechanical engineering assistant professor Will Northrop explores the possibility of powering automobiles with hydrogen. Nov. 18: Minnesota Daily

Robot cars will change your life–maybe
Civil engineering professor David Levinson explains that what makes autonomous vehicles much safer is that they can react far more quickly and precisely to their surroundings. Nov. 14: MinnPost

U of M astrophysicists eyeing comet landing
Physics professor Terry Jones has studied comet dust. Data from the Philae probe will hopefully provide priceless information for his research. Nov. 13: KARE

U of M project was ‘like building in a phone booth’
The University’s Gore Annex addition was completed. The 40,000 square-foot space will house an FEI Tecnai Femto ultrafast electron microscope, which will enable researchers to learn more about materials at the atomic and molecular scale. Nov. 12: Finance & Commerce; KSTP; KARE; Nov. 17: Minnesota Daily

Finally, science explains why no one can lift Thor’s hammer
Physics professor James Kakalios explains an episode of Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. on ABC, where only Avenger Thor was able to pick up his hammer. Nov. 12: WIRED

U of M invents device for early detection of serious illness
CSE engineers invented a hand-held device, known as z-Lab, that could revolutionize the way doctors detect serious illnesses, like cancer and heart disease. Nov. 11: Minnesota Daily; Nov. 12: WCCO; KARE; KSTP; KAAL; Nov. 13: Bring Me The News

University files lawsuits against Verizon, At&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile
Electrical and computer engineering professor Georgios Giannakis invented key technology behind the LTE protocol used by four of the largest cell phone carriers. Nov. 11: Ars Technica

U of M prof: Want better roads? Disband MnDOT
Civil, environmental, and geo- engineering professor David Levinson wants to replace MnDOT with a publicly owned roads utility that would operate separately from state government. Nov. 5: Finance & Commerce

University chemistry researcher awarded $60,000 L’Oreal For Women in Science Fellowship
University of Minnesota chemistry researcher Jenny Laaser is one of only five recipients nationwide of the 2014 L’Oréal USA For Women in Science Fellowship. Nov. 6: BizWomen

U pollution bead research nabs gold at national competition
CSE students participated in the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) where students design and build biological systems. Nov. 4: Minnesota Daily

October 2014

$6 million sought for studies on mining
Department of Civil, Environmental, and Geo- Engineering head Joe Labuz said he hopes the University will allocate funding toward mining activities. Oct. 29: Star TribuneMinnesota Daily

University researchers backing drones usage, surveying farmlands with technology
Aerospace engineering and mechanics associate professor Demoz Gebre-Egziabher discusses University-developed drone software and law enforcement, military, and other applications of drone technology. Oct. 28: Star TribuneMinnesota Daily

Countries away, helping farmers
Electrical engineering graduate student, Sri Latha Ganti, and other University students created MyRain, a company that sells drip irrigation kits to farmers in India. Oct. 27: Minnesota Daily

Researchers are building drones you can control with your mind
Biomedical engineering professor Bin He’s research with mind-controlled drones is cited. Oct. 24: Business Insider

U of M hosts solar eclipse watch party
Hundreds gathered on the roof of Tate Laboratory of Physics to observe a partial solar eclipse. Oct. 23: KSTP; WCCO; KARE; KQRS; KARE

U of M hosts 4th annual Cyber Security Summit
Electrical and computer engineering professor Massoud Amin discusses the annual Cyber Security Summit. Oct. 21: WCCOWCCO (podcast); Bring Me The News

Coloring outside the lines
Researchers at the University’s Polar Geospatial Center are researching spectral mapping techniques that offer a new view of old rocks in Antarctica. Oct. 17: Antarctic Sun

Almost like being there
Researchers at the University’s Polar Geospatial Center have developed a special kind of map of a region in the Transantarctic Mountains by using multispectral imagery that was collected by a satellite in orbit. Oct. 17: Antarctic Sun

Land O’Lakes announces Global Food Challenge Emerging Leaders for Food Security Program
Three University of Minnesota students have been selected for the new Land O’Lakes, Inc. Global Food Challenge Emerging Leaders for Food Security fellowship, a unique yearlong internship and development program for 10 students at five universities. Oct. 16: Sys-con Media; Oct. 17: Perishable News; Oct. 20: Dairy Herd Management;

Your smartphone would be dumb without federally funded University research
Federally funded university research has led to dozens of new companies. The University was honored for two startups last year, one of which improved MRIs and one of which is finding more effective ways to generate energy from fossil fuels. Oct. 14: Huffington Post

MNsure rates: Most going up, insurers say
School of Mathematics teaching specialist David Brokken discusses the 2015 MNsure rate change. Oct. 6: MinnPost; Oct. 14: Pioneer Press; Oct. 15: Bring Me The NewsSCTimes

University receives two NIH grants originating from President Obama’s BRAIN initiative
The University’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) is among the first to be awarded two federal grants resulting from President Obama’s BRAIN Initiative to develop next generation neuroimaging technology. Oct. 9: MinnPost; Oct. 14: Minnesota Daily; Oct. 15: KSTP

America’s 10 Best Cities for commuting on public transit
Civil engineering professor David Levinson analyzed data on calculating job access through public transit. Oct. 7: Washington Post; StreetsBlog; Wired; Star Tribune; Oct. 8: Minnesota Public Radio

University’s microtech center keeping pace with shrinking technology
Electrical and computer engineering professor Jianping Wang and physics professor Paul Crowell discuss the University’s Center for Spintronic Materials, Interfaces and Novel Architectures that is working to harness electronic spin to create faster, energy-efficient computers. Oct. 7: Minnesota Daily

Fermilab’s 500-mile neutrino experiment up and running
After nearly five years of construction, scientists are now using the two massive detectors – placed 500 miles apart – to study one of nature’s most elusive subatomic particles. Oct. 6: Symmetry Magazine; The Guardian; William and Mary; The Daily Galaxy; Interactions.org; Oct. 7: ExtremeTech; Oct. 8: Gizmodo; Engineering.com; Oct. 9: Gizmodo-India

Engineers show light can play seesaw at the nanoscale
Electrical engineering researchers have developed a unique nanoscale device that for the first time demonstrates mechanical transportation of light. Oct. 3: Photonics

New study shows that yoga and meditation may help train the brain
Biomedical engineering professor Bin He studied learning patterns of participants’ through brain activity as they used left and right hand movements. Those using yoga and meditation learned three times faster than those who had little or no experience with these practices. Oct. 3: Science World Report;  World Scientific; University Herald; Oct. 4: Digital JournalThe Health SiteLatinos Health; Oct. 5: PsychCentral; Oct. 6: Deccan Chronicle; Oct. 7: Red Orbit; Oct. 9: Minnesota Daily; Oct. 19: El Universal Ciencia; Oct. 24: NIH Record

September 2014

Good Question: Why do we use so much plastic?
Chemistry professor Marc Hillmyer discusses California’s ban of single-use plastic bags, noting that plastic can wreak havoc on our natural environment. Sept. 30: WCCO

University receives two NIH grants originating from President Obama’s BRAIN initiative
The University’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) is among the first to be awarded two federal grants resulting from President Obama’s BRAIN Initiative to develop next generation neuroimaging technology. Sept. 30: Star Tribune

Simulations reveal an unusual death for ancient stars
Supercomputers at the University were used to run simulations of the Universe’s first-generation of stars, concluding that they would have exploded completely leaving no remnant black hole behind. Sept. 29: EurekAlert!esciencenews; Phys.org; Daily Mail; UC Santa Cruz; Science World Report; Science Codex; R&D Magazine; Berkeley Lab; NERSC

One way to deal with a desire line
Civil engineering professor David Levinson comments on pedestrian’s desire lines which establish evidence of a direct line. Sept. 29: Daily Planet

The road to Vision Zero has some bumps in it
Civil engineering professor David Levinson notes that speed humps are not the most efficient way to slow down traffic. Sept. 28: NY City Lens

New study shows that yoga and meditation may help train the brain
Biomedical engineering professor Bin He studied learning patterns of participants’ through brain activity as they used left and right hand movements. Those using yoga and meditation learned three times faster than those who had little or no experience with these practices. Sept. 25: Science CodexScience 2.0Medical XPressFox News; Latinos Health; Sept. 26: New Indian ExpressScientific ComputingVenture BeatWe Are Central PA;  Science 360Medical Research; International Business Times; Tribune; Financial Express; Times of India; Medical Daily; Health & Wellbeing; FARS News; Nine MSN; Yahoo News!; Health Site; News Medical; Medical Research; Wonder Woman; Zee News India; Sept. 27: Free Malaysia Today; Hindustan TimesExaminer; CTV News; FMT News; The New Age; Sept. 29: MinnPost; iafrica; Noticia de la Ciencia; ShinyShiny

University officials, experts weigh in on net neutrality
Mathematics professor Andrew Odlyzko says the FCC may wait until after the fall’s elections to enact new regulations to safeguard the Internet in the future. Sept. 24: Minnesota Daily

Engineers show light can play seesaw at the nanoscale
Electrical engineering researchers have developed a unique nanoscale device that for the first time demonstrates mechanical transportation of light. Sept. 22: Eurekalert!; Phys.org; Opli; Nanotechnology Now; Product Design & Development; Science Codex; Science 2.0; Nanowerk; Sept. 23: Laboratory Equipment; R&D Magazine; Controlled Environments; Azonano; The Engineer; Semiconductor Research Corporation; EE Times; NSF News

First-class innovators
University students in the new Medical Device Innovation program are learning how to get ideas to market. Sept. 22: Minnesota Business Magazine

CSE fall career fair is a zoo
An estimated 600 recruiting representatives from 186 different employers turned out at CSE’s fall career fair, that can accommodate 3,000 students. Sept. 17: Tech(dot)MN; Sept. 23: Minnesota Daily

Bus stop amenities shorten wait
Civil engineering professor David Levinson is leading research that examines perceived waiting time at bus stations. Sept. 17: Minnesota Daily

St. Anthony Falls Lab completes renovation
The University celebrated a nearly $16 million renovation on the historic St. Anthony Falls Laboratory. Sept. 16: KSTP; WCCO; KARE; Minnesota Public Radio; Sept. 17: Star Tribune; Minnesota Daily

Pavement 101: ‘Minnesota Mix’ and the fast-changing technologies under your shoes and tires
Civil engineering professor Lev Khazanovich discusses the two types of pavement, and the special materials used in paving to survive Minnesota’s weather. Sept. 11: MinnPost

U forges way as plastics research leader, using $20M grant to find greener alternatives
Chemistry professor Marc Hillmyer leads the Center for Sustainable Polymers, which received a five-year, $20 million grant from the National Science Foundation to research disposable, non-toxic plastics created from renewable resources. Sept. 10: Minnesota Daily; Sept. 15: Star Tribune; Washington Times; Sept. 28: Pioneer Press

A push to sell research
As the University is pursuing its goal of steering STEM discoveries from the lab to the market, Medical Devices Center director Art Erdman says the center draws several industry partners each year that are interested in purchasing the inventions that come out of the center’s labs. Sept. 9: Minnesota Daily

Son’s gift to writer mom is one for the books
CSE freshman Stryker Thompson secretly had his mother’s book self-published. Sept. 7: Star Tribune; Today

Land O’Lakes gives $25 million to University of Minnesota
CSE will receive part of a major gift from Land O’Lakes to be used for college programming. Sept. 2: Yahoo! Finance; Sept. 3: Star Tribune; WCCO; KARE; Pioneer Press; Sept. 4: Minnesota Daily

Green Line: Inventor proposes using timing, speed to improve travel time
Civil engineering program director and Minnesota Traffic Observatory director John Hourdos comments on a proposed concept to improve Green Line times. Sept. 2: Pioneer Press; Sept. 18: Minnesota Public Radio

August 2014

Supernova impostors baffle astronomers
Astronomy professor Roberta Humphreys discusses supernova “impostors” that mimic true core collapsing supernovae. Aug. 28: Forbes

“WHY?” a show about science in the Twin Cities
Chemical engineering and materials science professor Chris Leighton discusses research into using pyrite in solar cells. Aug. 26: MySPNN

U crowdsources distracted drivers at the State Fair
Mechanical engineering researchers in the Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Institute at the University of Minnesota are trying to bring in thousands of fairgoers to be part of several crowd-sourced research projects, including “Distraction Dodger,” an Internet-based video game. Aug. 23: KMSP

One, two, 3.79 million: How many penguins are there?
CSE research associate Michelle LaRue is involved with research that found that Adelie Penguin populations are increasing, but that doesn’t mean the birds aren’t still threatened by climate change. Aug. 21: Audubon Magazine

4.5 million patients victimized in national hospital data breach
Electrical and computer engineering professor Massoud Amin comments on a recent data breach ever to hit the health care industry. Aug. 18: KSTP

Road safety: is V2V soon to be a reality?
Civil engineering program director and Minnesota Traffic Observatory director John Hourdos discusses vehicle-to-vehicle communication, that uses radio signals to share data about a vehicle’s speed, direction, and other information to nearby vehicles. Aug. 18: KMSP

Eleven years after the U.S.-Canadian blackout, what has (and hasn’t) changed
Electrical and computer engineering professor Massoud Amin discusses the changes made to the smart grid over the past eleven years. Aug. 15: National Geographic

U of M breaks startup record again, churns out 15 companies
Mechanical engineering professor Alison Hubel was among the University’s 15 start-up companies based on discoveries and inventions by its researchers during the past year. Aug. 14: Star Tribune, Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal; WCCO

Fuel fight: corn waste wades into renewable fracas
Bioproducts and biosystems engineering assistant professor Jason Hill discusses a plant that will produce cellulosic ethanol from the stalk, husk, and other waste parts of corn. Aug. 13: U.S. News

The Drive: Are our roads really more clogged?
Civil engineering professor David Levinson discusses conflicting reports on the Twin Cities’ level of traffic congestion. Aug. 10: Star Tribune

Engineers want to fill up your tank with sunlight
Mechanical engineering professor Jane Davidson discusses research into solar power, to expand the nation’s renewable energy sources. Aug. 7: NSF Science NationPBS News Hour; Wildscreen

Dean turnover affects colleges
CSE Dean Steven Crouch has served as the college’s dean for nine years, though dean’s at the University don’t stay in the position for very long because so much is required of him or her. Aug. 6: Minnesota Daily

At Minnesota’s Farmfest, drones and data fly onto the agenda
Computer science and engineering scientist Mike Bazakos showed uses of unmanned aerial vehicles in farming at Minnesota’s Farmfest. Aug. 5: Star Tribune

Solar car race finishes at the U of M
The University of Minnesota Solar Vehicle Project team took second place out of 10 teams in the American Solar Challenge, an eight-day, 1,700-mile race that started in Austin, Texas and ended in Minneapolis. Aug. 5: WTIP

We don’t pay enough for transportation
Civil engineering professor David Levinson details the hidden costs of transportation. Aug. 4: Transportationist; Aug. 8: The Boston Globe

Round table: Future of bridge, road safety in Minnesota
Civil engineering professor David Levinson discusses infrastructure needs in Minnesota’s bridges and roads. Aug. 1: KSTP

July 2014

Ridership projections reveal tricky calculus for transit planners
Civil engineering professor David Levinson discusses ridership forecast numbers, which in the past have overestimated transit ridership. July 31: Star Tribune

Solar car race finishes at the U of M
The University of Minnesota Solar Vehicle Project team took second place out of 10 teams in the American Solar Challenge, an eight-day, 1,700-mile race that started in Austin, Texas and ended in Minneapolis. July 27: Bring Me The News; July 28: KSTP; WCCO; July 29: Star Tribune; KARE: Pioneer Press; WMNN; WTIP

How a solar storm could know out the world’s power
Electrical and computer engineering professor Massoud Amin explains how ‘coronal mass ejections’ could affect Minnesota’s power grid. July 25: Minnesota Public Radio

University of Minnesota’s sub-atomic particle detector experiment reaches milestone
The University is celebrating a milestone in creating an experimental particle detector that could eventually yield important information about the beginning of the Universe. July 24: Star Tribune; WDIO; July 25: Northland News Center; July 29: Timberjay; International Falls Journal; July 30: Minnesota Daily

$1.88 billion Red River diversion will have model open house in Rosemount
The $2.6 million, 80-by-70 foot model shows the project’s Maple River Aqueduct, where the diversion channel would pass. July 16: Prairie Business; July 21: Dredging Today; July 24: Pioneer Press; WDAY; Valley News Live; July 30: Minnesota Daily

Solar cars use Norman area during pit stop
Eight solar racing teams from around the world including students from the University of Minnesota, made a pit stop at the University of Oklahoma on their eight-day trek across seven states that begin in Austin, Texas and will conclude Monday in Minneapolis. July 23: Norman Transcript

Jobs in STEM fields stagnant as Minnesota’s job market rebounds
Civil, environmental, and geo-engineering professor Arturo Schultz said that although those receiving STEM-related doctoral degrees and seeking employment in STEM fields employment rates are lower than they have been in a decade, the job market is in favor of engineering students, especially those in structural engineering. July 23: Minnesota Daily

Getting Lean in Education–by getting out of the classroom
Civil, environmental, and geo-engineering professor emeritus Karl Smith piloted a class of STEM educators who ran the first I-Corps for Learning class. July 23: Huffington Post
University researcher Michelle LaRue comments on a study released that claims emperor penguins are predicted to go into decline this century. However, LaRue has found that penguins can move to new breeding grounds, thereby giving them a better chance at survival. July 21: The Star

Geomorphology: Emergent sculpture
Earth science professor Chris Paola explains the development of sandstone and other striking landforms in national parks around the world. July 20: Nature Geoscience

Aging US power grid blacks out more than any other developed nation
Electrical and computer engineering professor Massoud Amin comments that each blackout in the United States cost tens of hundreds of millions, up to billions, of dollars in economic losses. July 17: International Business Times

Solar car charged up for cross-country race
A team of University students is gearing up for a national race next week in a solar car they’ve worked on for thousands of hours. July 16: Minnesota Daily; July 27: Pioneer Press

University of Minnesota researchers develop navigation app for the blind and visually impaired
Researchers and students at the University of Minnesota are developing a smartphone app to help blind and visually impaired people navigate streets in Minneapolis. July 15: Star Tribune

New study finds that Adelie penguin population is on the rise
University researchers used a new method that permits regular monitoring of Adelie penguins across their entire breeding range. July 9: EurekAlert!; Science 2.0; Nassau News Live; Science Codex; Newswise; Phys.org; Digital Journal; Yahoo News!; July 10: Wall Street Journal; Red Orbit; July 15: Birds News; National Review; July 16: Newsday; July 18: News Channel Daily; Truth Dig

An interim advocate for grad students
Earth sciences professor and acting vice provost and dean of graduate education Sally Kohlstedt wanted to bring optimism in light of the recent restructuring of the University’s Graduate School, in her temporary role. July 9: Minnesota Daily

U of M’s new solar vehicle Centaurus III
University science and engineering students built a solar car, Centaurus, that will compete in this year’s American Solar Challenge. July 7: KSTP; KMSP; WCCO; July 16: Minnesota Daily

June 2014

The Drive: An app designed to lead the blind safely
University researchers, in partnership with the Minnesota Department of Transportation, are developing a new smartphone application to help make it safer for pedestrians who are blind or have poor vision to navigate around construction zones. June 29: Star Tribune

Melting ice puts emperor penguins on a slippery slope
University researcher Michelle LaRue comments on a study released that claims emperor penguins are predicted to go into decline this century. However, LaRue has found that penguins can move to new breeding grounds, thereby giving them a better chance at survival. June 29: New Scientist; June 30: The Scientist; University Herald; July 21: The Star

The ghosts and the machine
Work on NOvA, a University physics laboratory to be used as a far detector in northern Minnesota, will be complete in July. June 28: The Economist; Business Insider

Blizzards may make wind turbines more efficient
University researchers are the first to use natural snow to visualize airflow of large-scale wind turbines. This research is essential to improving wind energy efficiency. June 24: National Geographic; Science 2.0; Phys.org; Nanowerk; Science Codex; Yahoo! News; LiveScience; June 25: Mother Nature Network; 3BL Media; Smithsonian; ECN Magazine; Laser Focus World; EcoWatch; Nature Asia (Japan); June 26: New Scientist; Daily Fusion; MeteoWeb (Italy); June 30: Wind Systems; WIRED (Italy)

Portland street fee: Is the obscure formula that determines what you pay ‘imperfect,’ or plain unfair?
Civil engineering professor David Levinson notes that many cities use property tax revenues or a sales tax to raise money for roads, while a street fee is at least nominally proportional to use. June 23: Oregon Live

U of M receives dollars to boost student innovation
Associate dean for research and planning Mostafa Kaveh noted that a $300,000 NSF I-Corps site award will allow science and engineering students to test their ideas in the marketplace. June 23: Minnesota Business Magazine

Manpower trumps technology for utilities in the ‘beltway of hurricanes’
Electrical and computer engineering professor Massoud Amin notes that weather now causes nearly three-quarters of big power losses. June 23: EE News

New study reveals emperor penguins can relocate and adapt to climate change
Research associate Michelle LaRue led a study that offers new insight on the long-term future of emperor penguins by showing that the penguins may be behaving in ways that allow them to adapt to their changing environment better than we expected. June 20: Science World Report; NBC; e! Science News; Nature World News; Environmental News Network; Yahoo News UK; Headlines & Global News; June 21: Auto World News; Big News Network; Maine News; Your Story; Utah People’s Post; American Live Wire; Design and Trend; Viral Global News; The Celebrity Cafe; News Tonight Africa; Techsonia; Nature World News; June 22: The Eastern Tribune; Wall Street OTC; Westside Story; Daily Digest News; Blue & Green Tomorrow; Uncover California; Canada Free Press; French Tribune; Delhi Daily News; India.com; Yotta Fire; Tech Times; Escapist; Sci-News; Saving Advice; Canada News; Northern Voices Online; Utah People’s Post; June 23: Live Science; Science RecorderWestside Story; Red Orbit; News Ledge; Science Blog; ecorazzi; Counsel & Heal; Haaretz; Economic Times; IANS; Design & Trend; Maine News; New York Sports Nut; June 24: CBSWashington Post; Maine News; Bring Me The News; Yahoo! News UK; Daily Digest; i24 News; UPI Science News; British Antarctic Survey; June 25: Austrian Tribune; Christian Science Monitor; Science Codex; Science 2.0; Latin Post; June 26: TeleManagement; Science Recorder; French Tribune; Sudan Vision; Red Orbit; The Denver Channel; June 28: Summit County Citizens Voice; June 30: The Scientist; Environmental Research Web

Funding the future of transportation
Civil engineering professor David Levinson offered his proposal for funding transportation. June 20: Minnesota Public Radio

U doctor caught off-guard by rising crime of phone scam
Electrical and computer engineering professor Massoud Amin said scammers armed with fake IRS badge numbers, spoofed numbers giving the appearance of a call from the IRS or another official agency and personal details about the victim have been increasing steadily during the past year.June 20: Star Tribune

Onsite energy generation is nice but centralized transmission is here to stay
Electrical and computer engineering professor Massoud Amin notes that if wind energy grows by 40 percent by 2030, it will require a 9-percent increase in high-voltage transmission. June 19: Forbes Magazine

CSE adds environmental engineering major
Civil engineering department head Joe Labuz said the new undergraduate environmental engineering major will be the only one of its kind in the state and will focus on issues like water treatment, hazardous waste, and air pollution. June 18: Minnesota Daily

This urban research university is also an economic powerhouse
Electrical and computer science professor Jian-Ping Wang created a magnetic nano-chip that detects proteins and DNA that signal the early stages of cancer. June 17: National Journal

Triumphant return of private U.S. passenger rail
Civil engineering professor David Levinson discusses evidence that’s looked at the economic development effect of high-speed rail has shown that there’s not a whole lot of local effect. June 17: Atlantic City Lab

A first ride on the Green Line-random thoughts
Civil engineering professor David Levinson and family rode the new Green Line on opening day. June 16: Twin Cities Daily Planet

Tech experts call for heightened cybersecurity
Experts at the University’s Technological Leadership Institute say the University should increase Internet security to ensure safe online practices. June 4: Minnesota Daily

African American enrollment down in U of M graduate programs
Earth sciences professor and acting vice provost and dean of graduate education Sally Kohlstedt expressed concern at the drop in enrollment of African-American graduate students. June 3: KSTP

University President and CSE Dean attend Chinese forum
University officials and researchers met with Chinese researchers to sign a cooperation memorandum of agreement, in which both sides agree to cooperate to ease China’s severe air pollution problem by studying particulate matter. June 3: Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

May 2014

Dismayed by falling black graduate enrollment, U of M boosts recruitment efforts
Earth sciences professor and acting vice provost and dean of graduate education Sally Kohlstedt expressed concern at the drop in enrollment of African-American graduate students. May 30: Minnesota Public Radio

How to build a biobased copolymer
Chemistry professor Mark Hillmyer and chemical engineering and materials science professor Frank Bates led a team that laid the groundwork for producing copolymers that have a wide range of properties and applications. May 29: C&EN

Weather balloon helps science soar in Bloomington schools
Aerospace engineering and mechanics assistant professor James Flaten worked with Bloomington middle school students to design a research study involving a weather balloon. May 29: KARE

U of M launches Master’s program in medical device innovation
The University launched its Masters of Science in Medical Device Innovation program. The medical technology industry employs more than 250,000 Minnesotans, and is projected to expand by more than 30 percent. May 29: KSTP

Foreign students sweep clean Bangalore footpaths
Assistant program director Brian Bell and CSE students studying abroad in India joined with a local group to clean up garbage mounds on footpaths. May 28: Times of India

University President and CSE Dean attend Chinese forum
University officials and researchers met with Chinese researchers to sign a cooperation memorandum of agreement, in which both sides agree to cooperate to ease China’s severe air pollution problem by studying particulate matter. May 28: XJTU News (China)

The color of pollution
Civil engineering associate professor Julian Marshall led research that found on average nationally, people of color are exposed to 38 percent higher levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) outdoor air pollution compared to white people. May 24: The Economist

New meteor shower debuts Friday night
Astronomy professor Terry Jones comments on the brand new meteor shower making its debut. May 23: KARE

Harnessing the carbon in climate change
Earth sciences professor Martin Saar explains geothermal energy, a means of storing CO2 in which our reliance upon fossil fuels will decrease. May 20: Medill Reports

Can the Twin Cities revive their glory days of tech innovation?
Charles Babbage Institute director Tom Misa’s book “Digital State: The story of Minnesota’s computing industry” focuses on the rise of Minnesota’s computer industry. May 17: Pioneer Press

FCC proposes new rules on Internet speeds
Computer science and engineering professor Joseph Konstan discusses Net Neutrality and the FCC’s proposed idea that allows for an Internet “fast lane.”May 16: KARE

Minnesota bans anti-bacterial chemical from soaps
Civil engineering professor Bill Arnold published research last year that found increasing levels of triclosan in the sediments of several lakes, leading Minnesota to become the first state to prohibit the use of triclosan in most retail consumer hygiene products. May 14: Pioneer PressBringMeTheNews; May 19: Star Tribune; May 20: ABC News; May 21: CNN; May 22: Minnesota Daily

Corporations must elevate IT experts, U speaker says
Electrical and computer engineering professor Massoud Amin discussed corporate community security workers at an event releasing new federal security guidelines. May 13: Star Tribune

Big Bang discovery comes under fire
Physics associate professor Clem Pryke denies claims that research his team performed was flawed in regards to gravitational waves that provide the first evidence of how the Universe expanded uniformly and almost instantaneously after the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago. May 12: Science; May 14: National Geographic; Huffington Post; Popular Science

U of M race team ready for international competition
The University’s Gopher Motorsports student group is preparing to travel to Michigan to participate in an international competition. May 11: KSTP

Tracking the most dangerous intersections for Minneapolis cyclists
Bicycle crash data reveals several intersections that are among the most dangerous for bicyclists. May 8: Minnesota Public Radio; May 10: KARE

Engineering majors: You’re hired!
Career Center for Science and Engineering director Mark Sorenson-Wagner notes that the demand for EE and ME graduates this year is strong. May 8: EE Times

Decoding Jeff Jonas: Wizard of big data
Babbage Institute senior research fellow James Cortada discusses analytics of data sets in big data. May 5: National Geographic

Sioux City data: Rear-end crashes increased at 5 red-light intersections
Civil engineering professor David Levinson commented on an increase in rear-end crashes at intersections where red-light cameras have been installed, and the decrease in more serious, right-angle crashes that may have otherwise occurred. May 3: Sioux City Journal

Solar jet fuel: World’s first ‘green’ jet needs only sunlight, water and carbon dioxide
Mechanical engineering professor Jane Davidson discusses an international goal to create commercially viable solar-to-fuel. May 2: Huffington Post

Why Spider-Man should just take the subway
Physics professor James Kakalios invented a fake-but-believable equation related to cell regeneration when acting as a physics adviser on the first “Amazing Spider-Man” movie. May 1: FiveThirtyEight

April 2014

U research pushes for agriculture drones
Brian Taylor with the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Research Group hopes to gain funding for a new precision agriculture research program. April 30: Minnesota Daily

Big companies back science education
Physics professor Jim Kakalios links science and pop culture to grow interest in STEM education. Big companies like 3M also strive to make math and science attractive to today’s students. April 26: Star Tribune

CSE touts student work
Assistant dean for undergraduate programs, Susan Kubitschek comments on the CSE Expo, an event that will bring more than 2,000 middle school students to campus on April 25 to experience more than 60 outdoor science experiments put on by CSE student organizations. April 24: Minnesota Daily

U unveils its ultra-tech nano lab
The University unveiled its new state-of-the-art physics and nanotechnology building. April 23:Star TribuneFinance & CommerceKSTP

The Drive: Education could reduce roundabout confusion
Civil engineering adjunct assistant professor, John Hourdos, said drivers need education to navigate roundabouts, perhaps included as part of the driver’s license test. April 21: Star Tribune

The 10 most polluted states for people of color
Civil engineering associate professor Julian Marshall led research that found on average nationally, people of color are exposed to 38 percent higher levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) outdoor air pollution compared to white people. April 15: Washington Post; Minnesota Public Radio; Science CodexStar Tribune; Medical Daily; Atlantic Cities; BringMeTheNews; Health; Science 2.0; Philly; April 16: Fast Company; MinnPost; April 17: Medical News Today; April 18: Boston Globe; April 20: MSNBC; April 21: MSNBC; Minnesota Daily

Course ratings, long secret, may go public at University of Minnesota
Mechanical engineering professor and chair of the Faculty Senate, Will Durfee, noted that students would not be able to see teacher ratings, only course ratings, as teacher evaluations are considered private data under state law. April 14: Star Tribune; April 16: Minnesota Daily

University’s Design of Medical Devices conference attracts medical leaders worldwide
The Design of Medical Devices conference covers topics such as advance in medical devices, surgical robots, and wearable medical devices. April 8: KSTP

The race to locate twitter users
Computer science and engineering assistant professor Brent Hecht says seemingly innocuous pieces of information can be tied together in ways that end up revealing something more sensitive. April 8: Wall Street Journal

Physicists find Big Bang’s smoking gun
Physics associate professor Clem Pryke led a research team that has observed the mark of gravitational waves that provide the first evidence of how the Universe expanded uniformly and almost instantaneously after the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago. April 3: Minnesota Daily; New Scientist

March 2014

University receives new sculptures
Two unique sculptures were installed at the new Physics and Nanotechnology building. The steel sculptures are 10 feet tall and weigh 3,000 pounds. March 29: WCCO; KARE

Movers & Shakers: Massoud Amin, University of Minnesota
Electrical and computer engineering professor Massoud Amin was profiled for his work overseeing recruiting for a newly launched master’s of science in medical device innovation program. March 23: Star Tribune

U of M professor has leading role in discovery of ripples from dawn of time
Physics and astronomy professor Clem Pryke co-led a research team that has found evidence of the universe’s earliest expansion after the Big Bang, a potentially Nobel Prize-winning discovery. March 17: New York Times; Harvard Gazette; Herald ScotlandUSA Today; BBC; Scientific American; Los Angeles Times; The Verge; Osel (Czech Republic); Futura Espace (France): BBC; Newsnight; KMSP; March 18: CNN; NBC; Boston GlobeStar Tribune; The Hindu; The Korea HeraldDes Moines Register; International Business Times; March 19: Minnesota Public Radio; New Scientist; March 20: CNN; Catholic Sentinel; Wired; March 21: Sydney Morning Times; Nature; NewStatesman; NyTeknik (Sweden); March 22: Business Mirror; March 23: New York Times; Japan Times; Yahoo News; Eagle Tribune; Day.az (Azerbaijan); Solopos (Indonesia); Info Oggi (Italy) March 24: City WireNew York TimesWTIP; PJ Media; Newswise; March 25: Online AthensWNPR; Guardian; Liberty Voice; Design & Trend; Christian Science Monitor; Wired; Article3; West Hawaii Today; Universe Today; Olympian; Blogger News; Charlotte Observer; Eyewitness NewsITWireMother Nature Network; Planetary Society; Syracuse.com; Daily Times Opinion; March 26: WVAS; Northern Voices Online; National Public Radio; March 27: The Cap Times; March 28: The Conversation: March 29: First News

New institute tackles the U’s data problem
Physics and astronomy professor and Minnesota Supercomputing Institute (MSI) director Jorge Vinals notes the difference between the U’s new Informatics Institute and MSI. March 12: Minnesota Daily

U of M professor describes difficulty of searching for missing plane
Aerospace engineering and mechanics professor Gary Balas said when planes fly over oceans, their ability to have radar contact is reduced. March 10: KSTP

Daylight saving time: the first sign of spring
Civil engineering professor David Levinson comments on the effects of daylight saving time from a traffic safety standpoint. March 9: Star Tribune

Bill banning chemical in anti-bacterial products passes committee
Civil engineering professor Bill Arnold led researchers who have found that Triclosan is building up in lakes and rivers and when exposed to sunlight it can be converted to dioxins, which are already considered toxic. March 7: KARE; March 11: Star Tribune

Minneapolis-St. Paul is No. 16 on the list of America’s worst traffic cities
Civil engineering professor David Levinson said that although the recent survey ranked the Twin Cities at No. 16 for worst traffic cities, demographic trends are helping to mitigate road congestion. March 7: Star Tribune

Phone cyberattack shuts down Mpls. teen crisis line for a day
Electrical and computer engineering professor Massoud Amin said these attacks are increasing and relatively easy to orchestrate. March 6: Star Tribune

Empowered students and postdocs drive lab safety
A volunteer group at the University, consists of grad students and postdocs from the departments of chemistry and chemical engineering and materials science are working to increase a culture of safety in labs. March 5: Science

A timely takeoff
Mechanical engineering professor Will Durfee’s engineering student John Condon worked as a startup company’s CTO. The company creates tiny gaming drones controlled with one hand. March: Minnesota Business Magazine

MSA pushing for new teacher evaluations
Earth sciences teaching associate professor Kent Kirkby and mechanical engineering professor and chair of the Faculty Senate’s Consultative Committee Will Durfee comment on the Minnesota Student Association’s position statement that could lead to changes in teacher evaluation forms. March 4: Minnesota Daily

U of M and Google team up for new smartphone technology
Google’s recently-revealed Project Tango, created in part with help from University researchers, reveals smartphones that can capture 3-D images of the space around you. March 3: KSTP; March 11: Minnesota Daily; March 15: Star Tribune

February 2014

U of M works with Google to create 3-D imaging smartphone
Google’s recently-revealed Project Tango, created in part with help from University researchers, reveals smartphones that can capture 3-D images of the space around you. Feb. 27: Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal; Bring Me The News

Newly discovered galaxy mirror conditions after the Big Bang
University astrophysicists Evan Skillman and Kristen McQuinn have discovered a tiny galaxy that is believed to mirror conditions in the first few minutes after the Big Bang. Feb. 27: Phys.org; Rai News (Italy)

U patches research funding
Following the sweeping federal budget cuts known as the sequester, associate physics professor Lucy Fortson applied for bridge funding but received less than she applied for. The assistance helps keep both of her researchers employed. Feb. 26: Minnesota Daily

Chemistry without women
Chemistry professor Laura Gagliardi and other prominent female scientists have written a petition recommending boycotting a conference that preliminarily listed all invitees as male. Feb. 17: Nature NewsBlog; Feb. 19: Chemistry World; Feb. 20: Salon; La Repubblica (Italy); Science Net Blog (China); Feb. 21: Il Resto del CarlinoWomen of ChinaIl Sole (Italy); News Science Net (China);Feb. 24: Inside Higher Ed

Molding young engineers at Tech Fest
The Works, a museum where children can explore science, engineering, technology, and mathematics hosts the 10th annual Tech Fest, a family engineering event in celebration of National Engineers Week. Feb. 19: KMSP; LillieNews; Family Fun Twin Cities

Grad school tests out new goals
Earth sciences professor and acting vice provost and dean of graduate education Sally Kohlstedt discussed the University’s Graduate Schools plans to establish learning outcomes for each of its more than 200 graduate programs. Feb. 20: Minnesota Daily

Imagine: A world where nobody owns their car
Civil engineering professor David Levinson discusses a futuristic world where “connected vehicle technology” is mandatory, and it becomes more economic to not own a car. Feb. 13: Atlantic Cities

Together in sickness, health and the lab
Assistant chemistry professors Renee Frontiera and James Johns accepted positions at the U because they felt the institution understood and accommodated the dilemma of spouses working in similar fields and wanting to work and live in the same city. Feb. 13: Minnesota Daily

Male Pinterest users are more interested in art than cars
Researchers at the U of M found that male users of Pinterest pin more content about photography, art, design, and home decor than sports, technology, and cars. Feb. 12: EurekAlert!; Phys.org;Newsroom America; Feb. 13: RedOrbit; Truthdive; Business Standard; ECN; Science Codex; Malaysia Sun; Feb. 17: Minnesota Daily; Feb. 24: Business 2 Community

Grades edge up, fuel old debate
Chemistry professor and associate dean for academic affairs Chris Cramer discusses debates over grade inflation–awarding higher marks than the work would have received in the past. Feb. 12: Minnesota Daily

Fermilab’s neutrino detector sees its first particles
Researchers from the U involved in the world’s longest-distance neutrino experiment have seen their first neutrinos. Feb. 11: Popular Science; Phys.orgSymmetry MagazineUniversity of Tennessee; Daily Galaxy; Beacon-News; Feb. 12: Courier News; Duluth News Tribune; Northland News Center; WDIO; Kane County Chronicle; Feb. 13: Pioneer Press; Feb. 14: Product Design & Development

Mind-controlled quadcopter demonstrates new possibilities for people who are paralyzed
Biomedical engineering professor Bin He created a brain-computer interface with the goal of helping people with disabilities, such as paralysis, regain the ability to do everyday tasks. Feb. 10: National Science Foundation; NSF 360; LiveScience; Microfinance Monitor; Feb. 11: NBC News; Tottenham News; Discovery News; CanIndia; National Science Foundation; Feb. 12: The International News; Business Standard; Oman Daily Observer; The Hindu; Zee News; Feb. 13: Crazy Engineers; AuthIntMail

Companies test drive U technology
The U is expanding its Minnesota Innovation Partnerships to help existing University technologies get more exposure. Mechanical engineering professor Susan Mantell has done research that is registered under the new program. Feb. 6: Minnesota Daily

Jobs study may mean higher pay
Mechanical engineering professor and chair of the Faculty Senate’s Consultative Committee Will Durfee, discusses the University’s job description redesign, which may result in increased pay for many employees. Feb. 4: Minnesota Daily

January 2014

U of M receives prestigious National Historic Chemical Landmark designation
The work of legendary chemistry professor Izaak M. Kolthoff, widely recognized as the “father” of modern analytical chemistry, has received the prestigious honor of being named a 2014 American Chemical Society National Historic Chemical Landmark. Jan. 31: Noodls; WN

Revamped radiation treatment schedule for common form of brain cancer can extend survival
Industrial and systems engineering assistant professor Kevin Leder co-lead a study that explored how glioblastoma cells respond to radiation therapy, and how that toughens them against the ravages of radiation. Jan. 30: Cell; Jan. 31: Dana-Farber Cancer InstituteHealthCanal

Atlanta’s total lack of preparedness
Civil engineering professor David Levinson discusses the recent winter storm that stranded thousands of motorists in Atlanta. Jan. 30: CNN; Jan. 31: WIBW

Valspar donates $1M for U of M science lab
Valspar Corp. is donating $1 million to CSE over a period of five years, to provide new high-tech equipment for the new undergraduate laboratory. Jan. 29: Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal; Jan. 30: Minnesota Daily

Geothermal power rings show promise
Post-doctoral earth sciences researcher Jimmy Randolph worked with a team that designed a novel geothermal power plant that would sequester large amounts of carbon dioxide underground as part of its operations. January 2014 ASME

A lot of luck: How teen survived parachuting accident
Physics and astronomy professor James Kakalios discusses the physics of falling from a great height; the air resistance, kinetic energy, and velocity as changing variables in a fall. Jan. 28: Today

Research funding gets a bump for 2014
Associate dean for research and planning, and electrical and engineering professor Mostafa Kaveh notes that federal science agencies saw small budget increases after major cuts. Jan. 28: Minnesota Daily

Now you see them, now you don’t
Two unique sculptures will be installed at the new Physics and Nanotechnology building. The steel sculptures are 10 feet tall and weigh 3,000 pounds. Jan. 22: Physics World

Cutting edge technology built into Minneapolis bridge
Carol Shield, civil engineering professor, and Brock Hedegaard, civil engineering graduate student, comment on the diagnostic tools and sensors that transmit data to the University from the I-35W bridge, built in 2008 over the Mississippi River. Jan. 16: KARE

Thousands of kids to head to the U of M for energy shows
Explosions, flames, and rock music are all a part of a unique University outreach program that
aims to interest elementary school students in science. Jan. 13: KSTP; Jan. 14: Star Tribune; Pioneer Press

St. Paul’s K’NEX master Austin Granger at it again-this time for a museum
Computer science and engineering student Austin Granger built the “World’s Largest K’NEX Ball Machine” at The Works museum in Bloomington. Jan. 10: Pioneer Press

Intense northern lights may dance above Minnesota tonight
Physics and astronomy professor Cynthia Cattell discussed a massive solar storm that may result in a spectacular northern lights display. Jan. 9: Minnesota Public Radio

University of Minnesota launches new master’s program for Medical Device Innovation
Students are being recruited for a new master’s program in medical device innovation, a program aimed at preparing students to manage the challenges of the medical device industry. Jan. 8: Star Tribune; Jan. 9: Miami HeraldPioneer PressStar Tribune; WCCO; KSTP; KAAL; KTTC; KEYCBring Me The News; Kansas City Star; Wahpeton Daily News; Charlotte News Observer; Fort Worth Star-Telegram; Austin Daily Herald; Colorado Springs Gazette; Centre Daily Times; Los Angeles Herald; World News; Herald Online; News Daily; Daily Journal; Fresh News; Topix; Jan. 10: KIOWMinneapolis St. Paul Business Journal; Medical Design Technology; QMed; NewsHour24; Silobreaker; Jan. 22: Minnesota Daily

Whose streets? Hennepin County’s streets!
Civil engineering professor David Levinson comments on the complexity of Minneapolis streets. Jan. 2: Twin Cities Daily Planet

Mapping the Earth’s polar regions
The University’s Polar Geospatial Center has released and made available a series of web-based applications using high-resolution images and maps showing the Arctic and Antarctica in unparalleled detail. Jan. 2: GIS Lounge; Jan. 3: The Antarctic Sun; Jan. 24: Time for Kids

Google Maps now includes Antarctica
The University’s Polar Geospatial Center has produced high-resolution imagery and maps of the Antarctic and Arctic in unprecedented detail. Backpacker (January); Jan. 30: Daily Mail