College-wide events

CTS Webinar and Council Meeting: Exploring a Smart Cloud Commuting Service

This presentation will feature a brief overview of project funded by the National Science Foundation on a "Smart Cloud Commuting Service" (SCCS) via shared autonomous vehicles (SAVs). It will also highlight two preliminary studies exploring the feasibility of the envisaged SCCS. The first includes the development of a queuing theoretical model to determine how many SAVs are needed to serve peak commute demands. The second involves a proposed hybrid spoke-n-hub with point-to-point transit service model that leverages the flexibility and autonomy of SAVs.

This webinar will be held in conjunction with a meeting of the CTS Transportation Safety and Traffic Flow Research Council.

Speakers

Zhi-Li Zhang is the associate director for research at the Digital Technology Center and a Distinguished McKnight University Professor and Qwest Chair Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota. His research interests include computer communication and networks, Internet technology, multimedia, and emerging applications.

Yanhua Li is an assistant professor in the Computer Science Department and Data Science Program at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, MA. His research interests include artificial intelligence and big data analytics in many contexts, including urban intelligence, smart cities, and urban planning and optimization.

This webinar is free to attend, but registration is required. Once you have registered, you will receive an email confirmation with a Zoom link. The link should not be shared with others; it is unique to you.

If you're unable to join us for the live broadcast, a recording of the webinar will be available on the event web page following the event.

For more information, please contact Kaydee Kirk at kkirk@umn.edu.

CAUSE Career Panel

CAUSE is hosting this career panel event for graduate students and postdocs.

It will be at CAUSE Zoom Headquarters. The food will be your homemade favorites.

In this event, there will be panel members offering perspectives from academia, industry and national labs. More specifically, from the University of Minnesota, Securian Financial and Lawrence Berkley National Lab. You'll find out the panelists' paths to their current career. You'll have the opportunity to ask questions, for example what it's like to be in those careers and what it takes to make it in those areas.

Please RSVP, so we can have a better idea of the attendance before.

MIfA Public Lecture: "Aurora: Mysteries of the Northern Lights"

Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020 
7-8 p.m. (Central)

The dancing, shimmering glow of the northern lights, the aurora borealis (and their counterpart in the southern hemisphere, the aurora australis) has amazed mankind for centuries. Early northern peoples from Alaska to Siberia have wondered about the lights and created legends to explain them. Now in the space age, experiments flown on satellites and rockets have shown that the aurora is produced by the impact of electrons on the upper atmosphere and is related to oscillations in the Earth’s magnetic field that are associated with solar activity. The aurora has also been seen at other planets such as Jupiter and Saturn and is likely to be present at planets in other solar systems. During this Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics (MIfA) virtual talk, Professor Bob Lysak will outline our present understanding of the causes of the aurora.

Register for the lecture!

ISyE Seminar “Making the Most of Inventory: Advance Inventory Availability at Stitch Fix”

Please join us for our next seminar of fall semester via Zoom. This seminar will feature John Khawam from Stitch Fix who will discuss making the most of inventory with advance inventory availability.

Recordings: The seminars will be recorded in Zoom and uploaded to the ISyE YouTube channel

Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020

3:30-4:30 p.m. - Graduate seminar
4:30 p.m. - Reception

Zoom meeting link
Password: 
ISyE2020

John Khawam
Data Science Manager
Inventory Optimization Algorithms
Stitch Fix

 

Universe @ Home: "Starlink: Stealing the Stars"

Hosted by the Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics

Date: Wednesday, 10/21
Time: 8-9 pm CDT

Extensive satellite constellations are becoming the new norm, and the consequences are dire for modern astronomy and stargazers. Starlink has led the charge, intending to launch thousands of satellites, and other companies are following in their footsteps. Is it too late to save the night sky?

Activity: How to view Starlink, how to contribute to citizen science projects documenting the degradation of the night sky

Register by 8 p.m. on the Tuesday before each event to receive an email with the link to join the event. 

To see our full schedule and register for an event, visit the Universe @ Home website.

Just Code: Power, Inequality, and the Global Political Economy of IT

Friday, Oct. 23, 2020 (9:30 a.m.-5:15 p.m. Central)
Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020 (9:30 a.m.-2:45 p.m. Central)

This one-and-a-half-day Charles Babbage Institute symposium will address how code—construed broadly, from software routines to bodies of law and policy—structures and reinforces power relations. It will explore the ways that individuals and institutions use software, algorithms, and computerized systems to establish, legitimize, and reinforce widespread social, material, commercial, and cultural inequalities and power imbalances.

This virtual event will also examine how individuals, unions, political organizations, and other institutions use code to fight for equality and justice. The presentations will draw from across the humanities and qualitative social sciences, including disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, science and technology studies, and communications. 

Register for the symposium!

MCFAM Seminar Series: “Quantifying the Impact of the Social Determinants of Health in the COVID-19 Era"

Please join us for our next seminar of fall semester via Zoom. This seminar will feature Shae Armstrong from Optum who will speak on quantifying the impact of the social determinants of health in the COVID-19 era.

Zoom meeting link

Shae Armstrong, Senior Healthcare Economic Consultant, OptumCare, Optum

About the lecture
The Social Determinants of Health (SDoH) are key factors in each person’s environment and life that influence clinical outcomes of their health and wellbeing. These factors include, but are not limited to, income, housing, food security, education, and geography. In the age of COVID-19, understanding these factors and how they correlate to each other is more important than ever. Once the healthcare industry gains insight on these clinical and financial impacts, it needs to translate that insight into policy to mitigate root cause issues to better serve patients across the country.

During this lecture, Armstrong will lay the foundation by defining what the Social Determinants of Health are and the various categories they fall into. She will also examine what data sources feed various SDoH models and limitations of said data sources. Next, she will conduct a deep-dive examination on a variety of case studies and models aimed at quantifying the short-term and long-term clinical and financial impacts of COVID-19. From there, she will touch on the future and impact of healthcare data analytics within the healthcare industry and as human beings navigating an unprecedented pandemic.

October Virtual Star Party

Hosted by the Bell Museum

Grab your star map and enjoy telescope observing from wherever you are. The Bell Museum's astronomy staff will guide you through the night sky as our telescope, with its new camera features, will live capture deep space objects and stream them to you virtually. Register on Eventbrite.

Don’t forget to download your own Minnesota Skies Guide!

Just Code: Power, Inequality, and the Global Political Economy of IT

Friday, Oct. 23, 2020 (9:30 a.m.-5:15 p.m. Central)
Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020 (9:30 a.m.-2:45 p.m. Central)

This one-and-a-half-day Charles Babbage Institute symposium will address how code—construed broadly, from software routines to bodies of law and policy—structures and reinforces power relations. It will explore the ways that individuals and institutions use software, algorithms, and computerized systems to establish, legitimize, and reinforce widespread social, material, commercial, and cultural inequalities and power imbalances.

This virtual event will also examine how individuals, unions, political organizations, and other institutions use code to fight for equality and justice. The presentations will draw from across the humanities and qualitative social sciences, including disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, science and technology studies, and communications. 

Register for the symposium!

Dr. John Carlis Memorial Lecture

The John V. Carlis Memorial Lecture is dedicated to the advancement of education and inclusion in the field of computing. The featured speaker for this year's virtual lecture is Charles Isbell, Dean of the College of Computing at Georgia Tech. Isbell’s research interests are varied but the unifying theme of his work has been using machine learning to build autonomous agents who engage directly with humans. His work has been featured in the popular press, congressional testimony, and in several technical collections.

Join Event Via Zoom

Advance registration not required—at the time of the lecture, log in using the event's Zoom invitation link.