College-wide events

St. Anthony Falls Laboratory Bi-Weekly Seminar Series

Guests are invited to attend in person or watch live online.

Every two weeks during the academic year, SAFL hosts prominent figures in environmental science and fluid mechanics. They come from all over the U.S. and the world to share their insight and inspire us to tackle important questions in the field. These seminars are free and open to the public. Join us to learn about the latest research advancements and network with contacts in the field.

Learn more about the Seminars!

Seminars will be presented by:

  • Oct. 19 - Teri Oehmke, University of California, Berkeley
  • Nov. 2 - Doug Jerolmack, University of Pennsylvania
  • Nov. 16 - Luca Brandt, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
  • Nov. 30 - Eric D'Asaro, University of Washington
  • Dec. 7 - Boya Xiong, University of Minnesota

Colloquium: Michel Janssen on The Einstein-Besso manuscript on the perihelion of Mercury

The Einstein-Besso manuscript on the perihelion of Mercury

This colloquium will have a remote option via zoom:
https://umn.zoom.us/j/94831171860 

MCFAM Seminar Series: “Kelly Criterion: From a Simple Random Walk to Levy Processes"

Please join us for our next seminar of fall semester! This seminar will feature Austin Pollok from the University of Southern California who will discuss the Kelly criterion.

Zoom meeting link

About the lecture

The original Kelly criterion provides a strategy to maximize the long-term growth of winnings in a sequence of simple Bernoulli bets with an edge—that is, when the expected return on each bet is positive. The objective of this work is to consider more general models of returns and the continuous time, or high-frequency, limits of those models. The results include an explicit expression for the optimal strategy in several models with continuous time compounding. Given that we know how to optimally bet, we seek to find an edge in the financial markets by investigating the volatility risk premium in option returns. With the aid of high frequency volatility forecasts, we are able to capture an economically significant increase in risk premium compared to competing models.

About the speaker

Austin Pollok is a Ph.D. student in applied mathematics at the University of Southern California (USC), set to graduate this year. His areas of research are in optimal growth strategies, such as the Kelly criterion, under heavy-tailed processes; high frequency volatility forecasting using machine learning methods; and empirical option pricing. He has worked at Capital Group Companies as a quantitative research engineer while completing his Ph.D.

St. Anthony Falls Laboratory Bi-Weekly Seminar Series

Guests are invited to attend in person or watch live online.

Every two weeks during the academic year, SAFL hosts prominent figures in environmental science and fluid mechanics. They come from all over the U.S. and the world to share their insight and inspire us to tackle important questions in the field. These seminars are free and open to the public. Join us to learn about the latest research advancements and network with contacts in the field.

Learn more about the Seminars!

Seminars will be presented by:

  • Oct. 19 - Teri Oehmke, University of California, Berkeley
  • Nov. 2 - Doug Jerolmack, University of Pennsylvania
  • Nov. 16 - Luca Brandt, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
  • Nov. 30 - Eric D'Asaro, University of Washington
  • Dec. 7 - Boya Xiong, University of Minnesota

CSE Winter Light Show

 Join the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering (CSE) for three dazzling light shows designed by science and engineering students. The high-tech light show features more than 250,000 LED lights set to music written and recorded by University of Minnesota students.

The CSE Winter Light Show dates are 

  • Thursday, Dec. 9, 2021
  • Friday, Dec. 10, 2021
  • Saturday, Dec. 11, 2021

Shows are at 5:30, 6 and 6:30 p.m. on the Civil Engineering Building Courtyard, 500 Pillsbury Dr. S.E., Minneapolis. Each show will last about 20 minutes. All events are free and open to the public. No tickets or reservations required.

Join us for a Premiere Party on Friday, Dec. 10, 2021, 5-6:30 p.m.

Now in its 10th year, the show has become a campus winter tradition. Lights will surround the semi-circular Civil Engineering Courtyard and will be synchronized to music for a 360-degree sensory outdoor experience. Features include a giant 22-foot lighted tree, two 8-foot 3D snowman signs, 8-foot lighted arches, a 5-foot-by-12-foot lighted pixelated changeable sign, a 6-foot circular light structure, 10 two-foot lighted snowflakes, and several lighted trees. The students estimate that the show includes more than five miles of lights and extension cords.

The light show is presented by the University of Minnesota Tesla Works student group. The show features the technical and creative skills of University of Minnesota science and engineering students and their ability to have fun on campus—even in the winter.

Share your photos on social media using #cselightshow.

CSE Winter Light Show and Premiere Party

 Join the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering (CSE) for three dazzling light shows designed by science and engineering students. The high-tech light show features more than 250,000 LED lights set to music written and recorded by University of Minnesota students.

The CSE Winter Light Show dates are 

  • Thursday, Dec. 9, 2021
  • Friday, Dec. 10, 2021
  • Saturday, Dec. 11, 2021

Shows are at 5:30, 6 and 6:30 p.m. on the Civil Engineering Building Courtyard, 500 Pillsbury Dr. S.E., Minneapolis. Each show will last about 20 minutes. All events are free and open to the public. No tickets or reservations required.

Join us for a Premiere Party on Friday, Dec. 10, 2021, 5-6:30 p.m.

Now in its 10th year, the show has become a campus winter tradition. Lights will surround the semi-circular Civil Engineering Courtyard and will be synchronized to music for a 360-degree sensory outdoor experience. Features include a giant 22-foot lighted tree, two 8-foot 3D snowman signs, 8-foot lighted arches, a 5-foot-by-12-foot lighted pixelated changeable sign, a 6-foot circular light structure, 10 two-foot lighted snowflakes, and several lighted trees. The students estimate that the show includes more than five miles of lights and extension cords.

The light show is presented by the University of Minnesota Tesla Works student group. The show features the technical and creative skills of University of Minnesota science and engineering students and their ability to have fun on campus—even in the winter.

Share your photos on social media using #cselightshow.

Virtual Star Party - Exploring the Geminids, Meteors, and Meteorites

Every December the Geminid meteor shower can be seen. It’s one of the northern hemisphere’s best meteor showers. But what are these “shooting stars” that streak across the sky? When should we look for them, and how do I know if I found a rock from space? The Bell Museum planetarium team will guide you on meteorites and meteor-wrongs, as we view the night sky through our telescopes from the Bell’s observation deck.

Registration is requested through Eventbrite in order to receive a secure Zoom Webinar link.

CSE Winter Light Show

Join the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering (CSE) for three dazzling light shows designed by science and engineering students. The high-tech light show features more than 250,000 LED lights set to music written and recorded by University of Minnesota students.

The CSE Winter Light Show dates are 

  • Thursday, Dec. 9, 2021
  • Friday, Dec. 10, 2021
  • Saturday, Dec. 11, 2021

Shows are at 5:30, 6 and 6:30 p.m. on the Civil Engineering Building Courtyard, 500 Pillsbury Dr. S.E., Minneapolis. Each show will last about 20 minutes. All events are free and open to the public. No tickets or reservations required.

Join us for a Premiere Party on Friday, Dec. 10, 2021, 5-6:30 p.m.

Now in its 10th year, the show has become a campus winter tradition. Lights will surround the semi-circular Civil Engineering Courtyard and will be synchronized to music for a 360-degree sensory outdoor experience. Features include a giant 22-foot lighted tree, two 8-foot 3D snowman signs, 8-foot lighted arches, a 5-foot-by-12-foot lighted pixelated changeable sign, a 6-foot circular light structure, 10 two-foot lighted snowflakes, and several lighted trees. The students estimate that the show includes more than five miles of lights and extension cords.

The light show is presented by the University of Minnesota Tesla Works student group. The show features the technical and creative skills of University of Minnesota science and engineering students and their ability to have fun on campus—even in the winter.

Share your photos on social media using #cselightshow.

ME Robot Show

The University of Minnesota Robot Show is the culmination of seven weeks of work for students in ME 2011: Introduction to Engineering.

THE TASK: Create a computer-controlled machine that "does something useful." Students received a small kit of parts, and could add no more than $60 of their own materials.
THE RESULT: Over 200 robots ready for public viewing!

This year's show is back in person so you can see the robots in action! Join us and support our talented students.

Geological Society of Minnesota Seminar

Seminar Lab presenter: Sheila Alfsen, M.A., Adjunct Professor of Geology, Portland State University

Seminar Lab presenter 1: William Orr, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus Geological Sciences, University of Oregon

Seminar Lab Subject: Assembling Oregon

Seminar Lab Location : Virtual lecture 7:00 PM CT. Registration instructions will be posted on the Geological Society of Minnesota website two weeks before the lecture.