Events

Fall 2021 Colloquium - Benjamin Feintzig

MCPS Lecture

Title: "Why care about quantization?"

Abstract: TBD


About 

Lectures begin at 3:35pm in Rapson Hall 45 on the East Bank of the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities campus. As a reminder, masks are required indoors by University of Minnesota policy. 

The Program in History of Science, Technology and Medicine and the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science will host a joint lecture series in Fall 2021. At this time, all events will be in-person unless otherwise stated. Please contact hstm@umn.edu for more information. 

 

Fall 2021 Colloquium - Elizabeth Toon

A simple test

Title: The Do-It-Herself Smear: Prevention Technology, Medical Practice, and Cervical Cancer Screening in 1960s Britain

Abstract: This talk is part of my larger project, 'Making Screening Work', on the history of cervical cancer screening in the United Kingdom.  While national health authorities registered support for a regular programme of cervical cancer screening early in the 1960s, it took until the end of that decade for facilities, practitioners, and systems to be fully ready to take on the challenge of providing the service to the UK's women. Even so, policymakers and leading medical experts disagreed about the best approaches to delivering screening, and were particularly worried about reaching rural women and women thought less likely for cultural, social, or economic reasons to attend.  One approach they trialled was what they called the 'do-it-herself smear', a form of self-sampling that -- theoretically, at least -- would allow women to participate in screening without visiting a GP or clinic.  In this talk, I discuss why this approach initially seemed appealing, and why it failed in practice, asking what it can tell us about the technological, social, and political challenges associated with the introduction of screening.  By focusing on historical discussions about the mundane realities of smear-taking, I show that we can better understand the larger challenges that instituting screening presented to medical organisation, and grasp how this new technology of prevention reshaped both the delivery of care and women's health experiences.


About 

Lectures begin at 3:35pm in Rapson Hall 45 on the East Bank of the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities campus.  As a reminder, masks are required indoors by University of Minnesota policy. 

The Program in History of Science, Technology and Medicine and the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science will host a joint lecture series in Fall 2021. At this time, all events will be in-person unless otherwise stated. Please contact hstm@umn.edu for more information. 

First Fridays - November

The Minnesota JCC Symphony Orchestra
The Minnesota JCC Symphony Orchestra

Title: Two slight taps, the lifting of a baton

Speaker: Kate Dietrick, Archivist, Upper Midwest Jewish Archives

As one of the oldest community orchestras in the country, the Minnesota JCC Symphony Orchestra has long been composed of musicians with day jobs from surgeon to postal carrier. Learn more and celebrate the recent anniversary of this notable musical group based out of the St. Paul Jewish Community Center.


Title: "The Job is Never Done" From the Progressive Era to the Covid Era in the Social Welfare History Archives

Speaker: Linnea Anderson, Archivist, Social Welfare History Archives

Explore unexpected and timely topics from the first collection donated to the Social Welfare History Archives and see the most recent digital collection related to the Covid response in New York City. Learn the famous figures, energetic graphics, and surprising connections with current issues in the records of Survey Associates, a Progressive Era publisher. See items from the Archives' newest digital collections that document how social work organizations responded to the Covid pandemic.

Register now


About 

First Fridays is a series of intellectually stimulating talks presented by the University of Minnesota Libraries’ Department of Archives and Special Collections (ASC) and is made possible by a generous gift from Governor Elmer L. and Mrs. Eleanor Andersen in honor of former University Librarian Dr. Edward B. Stanford.

Fall 2021 Colloquium - Elena Conis

Title: Vaccination and its Historical Documents

Abstract: TBD


About 

Lectures begin at 3:35pm in Rapson Hall 45 on the East Bank of the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities campus.  As a reminder, masks are required indoors by University of Minnesota policy. 

The Program in History of Science, Technology and Medicine and the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science will host a joint lecture series in Fall 2021. At this time, all events will be in-person unless otherwise stated. Please contact hstm@umn.edu for more information. 

Fall 2021 Colloquium - Mackenzie Cooley

Cooley Renn picture

Title: "Making Razze: Knowing and Controlling Animal Generation, 1500-1600"

Abstract: The Renaissance is celebrated for its belief that man could fashion himself to greatness. But there is a dark parallel to this fêted history. Those same men and women who were offering profound advancements in understanding the human condition, laying the foundations of the Scientific Revolution, were fascinated with controlling that condition and the wider natural world. This talk introduces The Perfection of Nature: Animals, Humans, and Race in the Renaissance (In Press, The University of Chicago Press), a book that traces how the Renaissance world – from the Mediterranean to Mexico City to the high mountains of the Andes – was marked by a lingering fascination with breeding. Just as one strand of the Renaissance celebrated a liberal view of human potential, another limited it by biology, reducing man to beast and prince to stud. Aristocrats, breeders, and intellectuals thought through generation as those around them endeavored to create improved animal bodies, traced here through the cases of Italian horses, Mesoamerican dogs, Andean camelids, and other creatures. As the idea of controlled breeding was brought to life again and again, a rich, complex, and ever-shifting language of race and breeding developed. The bureaucratic language of “razze,” employed to designate a selected population thought to embody fragile differences over a few short generations, slipped from animals, becoming more permanent and hierarchical when applied to humans living in European colonies in this chapter of the long and convoluted history of race.


About 

Lectures begin at 3:35pm in Rapson Hall 45 on the East Bank of the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities campus. As a reminder, masks are required indoors by University of Minnesota policy. 

The Program in History of Science, Technology and Medicine and the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science will host a joint lecture series in Fall 2021. At this time, all events will be in-person unless otherwise stated. Please contact hstm@umn.edu for more information. 

Fall 2021 Colloquium - Subrena Smith

MCPS Lecture

Title: “What’s to be Gained from an Evolutionary Approach to Behavior?"

Abstract: TBD


About 

Lectures begin at 3:35pm in Rapson Hall 45 on the East Bank of the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities campus. As a reminder, masks are required indoors by University of Minnesota policy. 

The Program in History of Science, Technology and Medicine and the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science will host a joint lecture series in Fall 2021. At this time, all events will be in-person unless otherwise stated. Please contact hstm@umn.edu for more information. 

First Fridays - December

Title: Do You Really Want This Stuff?"  The Early Years of the Northwest Architectural Archives

Speaker: Al Lathrop and Barb Bezat, Northwest Architectural Archives

To this question, Al replied emphatically, "Yes!" Hear the lighthearted reflections of the two individuals who made it happen.

Register now


About 

First Fridays is a series of intellectually stimulating talks presented by the University of Minnesota Libraries’ Department of Archives and Special Collections (ASC) and is made possible by a generous gift from Governor Elmer L. and Mrs. Eleanor Andersen in honor of former University Librarian Dr. Edward B. Stanford.

 

Fall 2021 Colloquium - Ashley Inglehart

Title: “Genesis, Creation, and Generation in Robert Boyle’s Natural Philosophy”

Abstract: TBD


About 

Lectures begin at 3:35pm in Rapson Hall 45 on the East Bank of the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities campus. As a reminder, masks are required indoors by University of Minnesota policy. 

The Program in History of Science, Technology and Medicine and the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science will host a joint lecture series in Fall 2021. At this time, all events will be in-person unless otherwise stated. Please contact hstm@umn.edu for more information. 

Fall 2021 Colloquium - Erika Milam

Title: “Philosophy Kings of Rocky Mountains: Marmots, Time, and Animal Behavior”

Abstract: TBD


About 

Lectures begin at 3:35pm in Rapson Hall 45 on the East Bank of the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities campus. As a reminder, masks are required indoors by University of Minnesota policy. 

The Program in History of Science, Technology and Medicine and the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science will host a joint lecture series in Fall 2021. At this time, all events will be in-person unless otherwise stated. Please contact hstm@umn.edu for more information. 

First Fridays - February

Title: ASC on the Air

Speaker: Rebecca Toov, Collections Archivist, University of Minnesota Archives

Join us in celebrating over 100 years of radio broadcasting at the University of Minnesota as we share recordings featuring the voices of staff and friends of the University Libraries.


Title: Digital Library Services and Archives & Special Collections: 20+ years of working and growing side by side

Speaker: Jennifer Claybourne, Digital Projects Specialist, Digital Library Services

Digital Library Services has been supporting early open access for Archives and Special collections through various projects and programs. Learn how we've grown and expanded in our own right, but still maintain a close connection with ASC through patron orders, strategic digitization and grant funded projects.


About 

First Fridays is a series of intellectually stimulating talks presented by the University of Minnesota Libraries’ Department of Archives and Special Collections (ASC) and is made possible by a generous gift from Governor Elmer L. and Mrs. Eleanor Andersen in honor of former University Librarian Dr. Edward B. Stanford.