Chemistry Events

Upcoming Events

Professor Ekaterina Pletneva

Professor Ekaterina Pletneva
Department of Chemistry
Dartmouth
Host: Professor Ambika Bhagi-Damodoran

Heme proteins are the main subjects of Professor Pletneva's research. In particular, researchers in her group have been focusing on ligand substitution reactions at the heme as a common platform for switching the protein structure and redox reactivity in signaling processes. They are investigating conformational properties of cytochrome c in apoptosis and correlate them to the protein peroxidase activity, which is critical for execution of this cellular pathway. We are also studying redox reactivity and folding of native sensors and engineered "switchable" proteins, in which changes in the oxidation state of the heme are linked to heme ligand substitution resulting in protein conformational rearrangements. 

Professor Justin Du Bois

Gassman Lecture #1
Professor Justin Du Bois
Department of Chemistry
Stanford University
Host: Professor Nicholas Race

Professor Du Bois' laboratory seeks to leverage the power of molecular design and chemical synthesis to address problems in catalysis, natural product assembly, chemical biology, and pharmacology. A goal is to develop C–H bond oxidative processes as general methods for organic synthesis and to demonstrate the utility of such tools in synthetic planning. These methods continue to be exploited for the purpose of preparing polyfunctionalized carbo- and heterocyclic structures in the total synthesis of complex natural products. Synthetic efforts focus on the role of ion channels in electrical conduction and the specific involvement of such proteins in the sensation of pain. De novo chemical synthesis of naturally occurring small molecule toxins in combination with the tools of molecular biology, electrophysiology, and cellular imaging enable the interrogation of mechanisms associated with ion channel expression, membrane translocation, turnover, and conduction.

Professor Du Bois

Professor Du Bois received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and his doctorate from the California Institute of Technology. Following a two-year National Institutes of Health post-doctoral position at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he joined the faculty at Stanford University. He is also on the faculty of the Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, a founding member of the NSF Center for Selective C-H Functionalization, an executive committee member of the Stanford Institute for Chemical Biology, and the founder of the Center for Molecular Analysis and Design.

In honor of Regents Professor Paul G. Gassman

Regents Professor Paul G. Gassman died in April 1993, at the age of 57. He was internationally known in the chemical community, and left behind a legacy of achievement. During his career, he served as mentor and adviser to 85 doctoral and master’s candidates as well as dozens of postdoctoral associates and undergraduate students. Numerous awards, honors, and honorary degrees were bestowed in recognition of his contributions to research and his service to the scientific, professional, and university communities. Some of these awards include election to the National Academy of Sciences (1989) and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1992); the James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry (1985); Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award (1986); and the National Catalyst Award of the Chemical Manufacturers Association (1990). He served as president of the American Chemical Society in 1990. He was co-chair of the organizing committees of the National Organic Symposium (1991) and the National Conferences on Undergraduate Research meeting (1992), on the University of Minnesota campus. It was his wish that a lectureship be established to bring distinguished organic chemists to the Department of Chemistry.

Professor Justin Du Bois

Gassman Lecture #2
Professor Justin Du Bois
Department of Chemistry
Stanford University
Host: Professor Nicholas Race

Professor Du Bois' laboratory seeks to leverage the power of molecular design and chemical synthesis to address problems in catalysis, natural product assembly, chemical biology, and pharmacology. A goal is to develop C–H bond oxidative processes as general methods for organic synthesis and to demonstrate the utility of such tools in synthetic planning. These methods continue to be exploited for the purpose of preparing polyfunctionalized carbo- and heterocyclic structures in the total synthesis of complex natural products. Synthetic efforts focus on the role of ion channels in electrical conduction and the specific involvement of such proteins in the sensation of pain. De novo chemical synthesis of naturally occurring small molecule toxins in combination with the tools of molecular biology, electrophysiology, and cellular imaging enable the interrogation of mechanisms associated with ion channel expression, membrane translocation, turnover, and conduction.

Professor Du Bois

Professor Du Bois received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and his doctorate from the California Institute of Technology. Following a two-year National Institutes of Health post-doctoral position at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he joined the faculty at Stanford University. He is also on the faculty of the Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, a founding member of the NSF Center for Selective C-H Functionalization, an executive committee member of the Stanford Institute for Chemical Biology, and the founder of the Center for Molecular Analysis and Design.

In honor of Regents Professor Paul G. Gassman

Regents Professor Paul G. Gassman died in April 1993, at the age of 57. He was internationally known in the chemical community, and left behind a legacy of achievement. During his career, he served as mentor and adviser to 85 doctoral and master’s candidates as well as dozens of postdoctoral associates and undergraduate students. Numerous awards, honors, and honorary degrees were bestowed in recognition of his contributions to research and his service to the scientific, professional, and university communities. Some of these awards include election to the National Academy of Sciences (1989) and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1992); the James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry (1985); Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award (1986); and the National Catalyst Award of the Chemical Manufacturers Association (1990). He served as president of the American Chemical Society in 1990. He was co-chair of the organizing committees of the National Organic Symposium (1991) and the National Conferences on Undergraduate Research meeting (1992), on the University of Minnesota campus. It was his wish that a lectureship be established to bring distinguished organic chemists to the Department of Chemistry.

Professor Justin Du Bois

Gassman Lecture #3
Professor Justin Du Bois
Department of Chemistry
Stanford University
Host: Professor Nicholas Race

Professor Du Bois' laboratory seeks to leverage the power of molecular design and chemical synthesis to address problems in catalysis, natural product assembly, chemical biology, and pharmacology. A goal is to develop C–H bond oxidative processes as general methods for organic synthesis and to demonstrate the utility of such tools in synthetic planning. These methods continue to be exploited for the purpose of preparing polyfunctionalized carbo- and heterocyclic structures in the total synthesis of complex natural products. Synthetic efforts focus on the role of ion channels in electrical conduction and the specific involvement of such proteins in the sensation of pain. De novo chemical synthesis of naturally occurring small molecule toxins in combination with the tools of molecular biology, electrophysiology, and cellular imaging enable the interrogation of mechanisms associated with ion channel expression, membrane translocation, turnover, and conduction.

Professor Du Bois

Professor Du Bois received his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and his doctorate from the California Institute of Technology. Following a two-year National Institutes of Health post-doctoral position at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he joined the faculty at Stanford University. He is also on the faculty of the Department of Chemical and Systems Biology, a founding member of the NSF Center for Selective C-H Functionalization, an executive committee member of the Stanford Institute for Chemical Biology, and the founder of the Center for Molecular Analysis and Design.

In honor of Regents Professor Paul G. Gassman

Regents Professor Paul G. Gassman died in April 1993, at the age of 57. He was internationally known in the chemical community, and left behind a legacy of achievement. During his career, he served as mentor and adviser to 85 doctoral and master’s candidates as well as dozens of postdoctoral associates and undergraduate students. Numerous awards, honors, and honorary degrees were bestowed in recognition of his contributions to research and his service to the scientific, professional, and university communities. Some of these awards include election to the National Academy of Sciences (1989) and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1992); the James Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry (1985); Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award (1986); and the National Catalyst Award of the Chemical Manufacturers Association (1990). He served as president of the American Chemical Society in 1990. He was co-chair of the organizing committees of the National Organic Symposium (1991) and the National Conferences on Undergraduate Research meeting (1992), on the University of Minnesota campus. It was his wish that a lectureship be established to bring distinguished organic chemists to the Department of Chemistry.

Professor Paul Anastas

Professor Paul Anastas
School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
Yale University

Paul T. Anastas is the Teresa and H. John Heinz III Professor in the Practice of Chemistry for the Environment and the director of the Center for Green Chemistry & Green Engineering at Yale University. He has appointments in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Department of Chemistry, and Department of Chemical Engineering. 

Anastas took public service leave from Yale to serve as the assistant administrator for the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Agency Science Advisor from 2009-2012. From 2004 -2006, he served as director of the ACS Green Chemistry Institute in Washington, D.C. He was previously the assistant director for the Environment in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy where he worked from 1999-2004. Trained as a synthetic organic chemist, Anastas received his doctorate from Brandeis University and worked as an industrial consultant.

He is credited with establishing the field of green chemistry during his time working for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as the chief of the Industrial Chemistry Branch and as the director of the U.S. Green Chemistry Program. Anastas has published widely on topics of science through sustainability including eleven books, such as Benign by Design, Designing Safer Polymers, Green Engineering, and his seminal work with co-author John Warner, Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice.