Professor Theodore Goodson III

 

Professor Theodore Goodson III
Department of Chemistry
University of Michigan
Host: Professor Aaron Massari

Abstract

Optical Properties of Novel Functional Organic Materials 

Organic conjugated molecules for optical and electronic applications have received great attention due to their versatility and relatively low manufacturing costs. While there has been great improvement of light conversion efficiency in certain photovoltaic materials, there still remain questions concerning the structural and inhomogeneity of the electron and energy transport processes. In this regard, understanding the fast processes (fs) at a local level (nm) in these systems is crucial in the design criteria for better performance in optical and electronic applications. In this presentation, the results of photo-physical dynamics of organic light harvesting materials will be described. These materials have been analyzed using time-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy as well as a nonlinear and quantum optical spectroscopy. Ultra-fast interferometric microscopic measurements were carried out to investigate the role of coherent energy transport in these organic photovoltaic materials. The use of these methods provide insights in to the dynamics and degree of heterogeneity in novel organic materials for optical and electronic applications.

Research

Professor Goodson's research group utilizes a number of spectroscopic techniques towards investigating the optical properties and applications of novel organic macromolecular materials. A major emphasis is placed on the new properties observed in organic macromolecules with branching repeat structures as well as organic macromolecules encapsulated with small metal particles. These materials have been suggested to be candidates for variety of applications involving light emitting devices, artificial light harvesting, strong optical limiters, enhanced nonlinear optical effects, quantum optical effects and as sensors in certain organic and biological devices.

Category
Departmental Seminar
Start date
Thursday, Dec. 10, 2020, 9:45 a.m.
End date
Thursday, Dec. 10, 2020, 11 a.m.
Location