Professor William DeGrado

Paul G. Gassman Lectureship in Chemistry
Professor  William DeGrado
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry
University of California San Francisco
Host: Professor Mark Distefano

Abstract

De novo protein design

De novo protein design, in which one designs proteins beginning from first principles, provides an approach that critically tests our understanding of protein folding and function, while also laying the groundwork for the design of novel proteins and biomimetic polymers. The de novo design of proteins has proven to be a useful approach for understanding the features in a protein sequence that allow them to fold into their unique three-dimensional structures, as well as how their structures achieve complex functions from molecular recognition to catalysis.  This talk will focus on the design of water-soluble proteins with predetermined structures and functions, including binding of metal ion cofactors and small molecules.

De novo protein design

Research

In the UC San Francisco lab of William DeGrado, PhD, we study the structural characterization of membrane proteins and de novo protein design in order to understand biological processes relevant to human disease and to develop novel therapeutics.

One primary research interest is de novo design, in which one designs proteins beginning from first principles. This approach critically tests our understanding of protein folding and function, while also laying the groundwork for the design of proteins and biomimetic polymers with properties not seen in nature.

De novo design of proteins has proven to be a useful approach for understanding the features in a protein sequence that cause it to fold into its unique three-dimensional structure. It has been possible to design functionally interesting proteins that bind redox-active cofactors, DNA, and transition metals. This approach has been extended to the design of membrane-active proteins, including ion channels, antibiotics, and fusogenic agents.

Professor William DeGrado

De novo protein design; membrane proteins; small molecule drug discovery for antimicrobials, influenza A virus, antifibrotics, and neurodegeneration; chemical biology; peptide design

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Start date
Tuesday, Nov. 30, 2021, 9:45 a.m.
End date
Tuesday, Nov. 30, 2021, 11 a.m.
Location

This seminar will be presented remotely and live-streamed
331 Smith Hall
Zoom Link