Department Seminar Series

The 2022-23 Department Seminars will be hosted virtually via Zoom and will take place on Thursdays at 4:00 p.m. The Zoom link for each individual seminar will be sent out in the weekly seminar announcement. If you do not receive these announcements and would like to join us for our virtual seminar, please send us an email so we may send you the appropriate Zoom webinar link. If you would like to be added to the seminar announcement list, please contact Kaleigh Swift at swift095@umn.edu.

If you missed a seminar, make sure to check our department YouTube channel for the recording. Seminar recordings are posted by 12:00 pm on the Friday following seminar. Please note, not all seminars will be posted as it is up to the discretion of our speakers. 

January 19
Dr. Wendy Bohon, Geologist and Science Communication Strategist for NASA Goddard Earth Science Division
Trust me, I'm a scientist: the science of science communication

January 26 *MOVED TO FEB 16*
Dr. Sonia M. Tikoo, Assistant Professor, Geophysics, Stanford University. 
Lunar Magnetism

Abstract
Dynamo magnetic fields are like the heartbearts of planets – invisible, yet detectable signals of activity within a body’s interior.  Remanent magnetism preserved in the lunar crust and paleomagnetic studies of Apollo samples collectively suggest that the early Moon generated a magnetic field.  However, the paleointensity history, longevity, and underlying driving mechanisms of the lunar dynamo are debated.  Here we discuss the latest developments in our understanding of the Moon’s enigmatic magnetic history.
 

February 2
Gary WeissmannProfessor, Earth & Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico
Building an Inclusive Environment in Academia through Activation of Multicontext Theory

Abstract
Our current approach to diversity, equity and inclusion in higher education is rooted in approaches that measure success by increasing the number of women and underrepresented minorities (URMs) who complete degrees. While these approaches achieved some success over the years, a lingering question is why are we still struggling to achieve these goals? Moreover, the meaning of an inclusive environment (one that attracts a diverse population, helps everyone thrive in that environment, and values a broad view of success in academia) has been unclear. Some solutions to these issues may be found in examining our academic culture using Multicontext theory in a framework of Context Diversity. Presently, the context of academic culture tends to value a hyper-individualized, or “low-context”, approach to inquiry (e.g., individuated, task-oriented, compartmentalized task and concept orientation, and linear and logical thought processes), while a more “high-context” approach (e.g., integrated, process-oriented, holistic, and systems thinking) is often less valued. Many women and URMs, as well as majority males, tend to approach learning and knowing from the less-valued, high context approaches. Multicontext theory is an organizational learning and institutional change model that explains the implication of this cultural imbalance by offering a new understanding of diversity in valid ways of knowing and doing. The theory allows us to articulate these cultural contexts and activate them at many levels via a Context Diversity Matrix that reframes our approaches to scientific inquiry and teaching, thus activating the full strengths of diverse populations.

February 9
TBD


February 16

Dr. Sonia M. Tikoo, Assistant Professor, Geophysics, Stanford University. 
Lunar Magnetism

Abstract
Dynamo magnetic fields are like the heartbearts of planets – invisible, yet detectable signals of activity within a body’s interior.  Remanent magnetism preserved in the lunar crust and paleomagnetic studies of Apollo samples collectively suggest that the early Moon generated a magnetic field.  However, the paleointensity history, longevity, and underlying driving mechanisms of the lunar dynamo are debated.  Here we discuss the latest developments in our understanding of the Moon’s enigmatic magnetic history.

February 23
No Seminar - Sedimentary Systems Science Faculty Search

 

March 2
No Seminar - Sedimentary Systems Science Faculty Search
 

March 9
No Seminar - Spring Break


March 16
No Seminar - Sedimentary Systems Science Faculty Search


March 23

No Seminar - Sedimentary Systems Science Faculty Search


March 30

Dr. Dana E. Petersen, Geophysicist, USGS
TBD


April 6

Dr. Julie Meachen, Associate Professor, Anatomy, Des Moines University
TBD


April 13

ESCI Confronting Colonization working group
Confronting Colonization and Unlearning Racism in the Geosciences (URGE)


April 20
Dr. Julia Steenberg, Phanerozoic Geologist, Minnesota Geological Survey
TBD


April 27
Dr. Katerina Gonzales, Postdoctoral Associate, Soil Water and Climate, University of Minnesota
TBD

Start date
Thursday, Feb. 2, 2023, 4 p.m.
End date
Thursday, Feb. 2, 2023, 5 p.m.
Location

Virtual via Zoom.

February 2
Gary WeissmannProfessor, Earth & Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico
Building an Inclusive Environment in Academia through Activation of Multicontext Theory

Abstract Below

 

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