Upcoming events

CS&E Colloquium: Learning the Language of Failure

The computer science colloquium takes place on Mondays from 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

This week's speaker, Andreas Zeller (CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security and Saarland University), will be giving a talk titled "Learning the Language of Failure."

Abstract

Software test generation (fuzzing) can be made much more effective if one knows what to search for. But how can users inform fuzzers about the program, its domain, and its input language? And how can they control what a fuzzer should do?

In this talk, I present and introduce tools and techniques that allow users to specify and learn the languages of program inputs, from recursive languages such as JavaScript to complex binary inputs, leveraging hundreds of existing format specifications. Our all-new FormatFuzzer tool that produces thousands of valid inputs per second, is now available as open source.

Biography

Andreas Zeller is faculty at the CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security and professor for Software Engineering at Saarland University, both in Saarbrücken, Germany. His research on automated debugging, mining software archives, specification mining, and security testing has proven highly influential. Zeller is an ACM Fellow and holds an ACM SIGSOFT Outstanding Research Award.

UMN Machine Learning Seminar

The UMN Machine Learning Seminar Series brings together faculty, students, and local industrial partners who are interested in the theoretical, computational, and applied aspects of machine learning, to pose problems, exchange ideas, and foster collaborations. The talks are every Thursday from 12 p.m. - 1 p.m. during the Fall 2021 semester.

This week's speaker is Yangyang Xu (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute).

Robotics Colloquium

This week's speaker is Stephen Guy.

Abstract

More information on this talk will be available at a later date.

Biography

Stephen J. Guy is an associate professor in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Minnesota. His research focuses on the development of artificial intelligence for use in autonomous robotics (e.g., collision avoidance and path planning under uncertainty) and computer simulations of human movement and behavior (e.g., crowd simulation and virtual characters). Stephen's work has had a wide influence in games, VR, and real-time graphics industries: his work on motion planning has been licensed by Relic Entertainment, EA, and other digital entertainment companies; he has been a speaker in the AI Summit at GDC, the leading conference in the games development industry. He is the recipient of several awards including the Charles E. Bowers Faculty Teaching Award and multiple best paper awards for his research work in simulation and planning. Stephen's academic work has appeared in top venues for robotics, AI and computer graphics including SIGGRAPH, IJRR, IEEE Trans. on Robotics, AAMAS, AAAI, and IJCAI. His work on simulating virtual humans has been widely covered in popular media including newspapers, magazines, documentaries, and late-night TV. Prior to joining Minnesota, he received his Ph.D. in Computer Science in 2012 from the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill with support from fellowships from Google, Intel, and the UNCF, and his B.S. in Computer Engineering with honors from the University of Virginia in 2006.

CS&E Colloquium

The computer science colloquium takes place on Mondays from 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Abstract

Coming soon

Biography

Coming soon

Graduate Programs Online Information Session

Prospective students can RSVP for an information session to learn about the following graduate programs:

  • Computer Science M.S.
  • Computer Science MCS
  • Computer Science Ph.D.
  • Data Science M.S.
  • Data Science Post-Baccalaureate Certificate

During the information session, we will go over the following:

  • Requirements (general)
  • Applying
  • Prerequisite requirements
  • What makes a strong applicant
  • Funding
  • Resources
  • Common questions
  • Questions from attendees

MSSE Online Information Session

Have all your questions about the Master of Science in Software Engineering (MSSE) program answered by attending this online information session.

RSVP now to reserve your spot.

Attendees will be sent a link prior to the event.
 

UMN Machine Learning Seminar

The UMN Machine Learning Seminar Series brings together faculty, students, and local industrial partners who are interested in the theoretical, computational, and applied aspects of machine learning, to pose problems, exchange ideas, and foster collaborations. The talks are every Thursday from 12 p.m. - 1 p.m. during the Fall 2021 semester.

This week's speaker is Lingzhou Xue (Penn State).

Minnesota Natural Language Processing Seminar Series: Diversity-Informed Dialogue Generation

The Minnesota Natural Language Processing (NLP) Seminar is a venue for faculty, postdocs, students, and anyone else interested in theoretical, computational, and human-centric aspects of natural language processing to exchange ideas and foster collaboration. The talks are every other Friday from 12 p.m. - 1 p.m. during the Fall 2021 semester.

This week's speaker, Katie Stasaski (University of California, Berkeley), will be giving a talk titled "Diversity-Informed Dialogue Generation."

Abstract

Coming soon

Biography

Katie Stasaski is a 6th year Ph.D. student at UC Berkeley, advised by Marti Hearst. She is interested in the intersection of natural language processing and education. Her past work has dealt specifically with increasing diversity of dialogue systems and generating complex questions. She is fortunate to be funded by an NSF GRFP and a Chancellor's Fellowship, in addition to an Amazon Machine Learning Research Award.

CS&E Colloquium

The computer science colloquium takes place on Mondays from 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Abstract

Coming soon

Biography

Coming soon

Last day of instruction

The last day of instruction for the fall 2021 semester is Wednesday, December 15.

View the full academic schedule on One Stop.